Enforcing Packaging Standards Across the Supply Chain delivers Ethical and Financial Value

PackagingGuest Blog: David Griffiths, Senior Product Marketing Manager at Adjuno

Switched on brands are becoming ever more aware of the importance of packaging when it comes to consumer experience. Far too few, however, have yet to address the extraordinary packaging inefficiencies that exist throughout the supply chain. Where is the consistency in packaging types -both material and size – that can not only enforce sustainability and ethical standards but also enable cost saving optimisation of pallets, containers and warehouse space? David Griffiths, Senior Product Marketing Manager, Adjuno, outlines the value of enforcing robust packaging standards across the global supply chain.

Packing, Shipping and Storing Air

Minimalist packaging may be the new black when it comes to consumer facing goods, but across the supply chain the situation is far from slick. When some retailers are handling thousands of different packaging types from suppliers globally, the implications on cost, sustainability and efficiency are very significant.

Given the risk of product damage associated with packaging that is too small, many suppliers will err on the large side – but the costs of this approach, both direct and indirect, are considerable. In addition to wasting money on unnecessary material, what about the wasted space? With multiple sizes used, pallets are not optimised, nor are containers; while oversized packaging also impacts the number of items that can be stored in the warehouse or distribution centre (DC), or in-store. Packing, shipping and storing air is an expensive business. Add in the cost of ethically disposing of damaged or unusable packaging, and reconsidering this area should be about far more than the consumer facing experience.

Plugging the Leak

With the rising pressure on costs and growing stakeholder expectations regarding ethical business practice, retailers need to take control and plug the financial leaks across the supply chain associated with packaging inefficiency. And that means defining and, critically, enforcing very clear packaging standards on suppliers.

Just consider the supply chain implications of reducing packaging types from thousands, even hundreds, to just a dozen – from the material consistency that transforms recycling and waste disposal activity to the optimisation of shipping and storage. And the financial returns that can be achieved by creating packaging standards across the world are significant – from a typical 5% to 10% reduction in the amount of packaging material being used to an improvement in container utilisation of 5% – 15%. The return on investment is compelling – and quick.

Enforcing Control

The starting point must be a robust review of requirements: what are the packaging requirements of the product? What are the space restrictions in the DC? What can containers handle? And what are the feasible packaging types that can be enforced? The challenge, however, is not simply to create these standards but to ensure they are enforced globally. Going through the exercise of rationalising packaging is great but fail to robustly enforce the standards and suppliers will rapidly revert back to using all various shapes and sizes.

Compliance is key – and that means ensuring a retailer has excellent visibility of the supplier’s packaging plans. The easiest approach is to automatically accept orders packed using the authorised sizes and materials. If a supplier cannot access approved packaging for some justifiable reason, retailers can also offer a short list of acceptable sizes – while also ensuring the substitution is automatically communicated. The big win is to have immediate visibility when a supplier proposes the use of unauthorised packaging – enabling a retailer to accept or reject an order based on the potential financial (and ethical) implications of failing to follow the defined standards.

It’s not just retailers that need visibility. In order to inspire suppliers to stick to the rules, they need to be easy to find as well as adhere to. Suppliers need to have excellent visibility of the retailers requirements in order to quickly locate the right type of packaging and keep the process running as efficiently as possible. 

Conclusion

This is a massive mindset shift – and one that will be increasingly considered not just at the time of each shipment but during supplier assessment. In a world where packaging is fast becoming a key component of sustainable and ethical business, a supplier’s commitment to the use of standardised packaging must become a fundamental component of the decision making process.

Minimalist packaging is indeed the new black – from supplier all the way through to consumer.

For more information, contact Adjuno. 

 

 

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Spacious Potential in the Sharing Economy

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

By ASCM CEO Abe Eshkenazi, CSCP, CPA, CAE

The sharing economy is no longer just a catchy turn of phrase; today, sharing, renting and subscription services are everywhere. AirBnB for your holiday rental; WeWork for freelancers who prefer the office environment; Rover for the pup’s midday walk; Uber and Lyft when you need someone to drive you places; and Zipcar, LimeBike or Bird Scooters when you’d rather do the driving yourself. The potential applications are endless.

Although only 19 percent of U.S. adults have engaged in a sharing-economy transaction, PwC research reveals that 83 percent of survey respondents believe these services make life more convenient and efficient, 76 percent say they are better for the environment, and 43 percent admit that owning things can feel like a burden.

As ownership becomes unfashionable, the fashion industry is also taking notice.

“In October, the mall fixture [Express] launched Style Trial, a service that allows customers to borrow up to three pieces — with no limits on exchanges, free shipping both ways and free dry cleaning — for $69.95 per month,” writes Jasmin Malik Chua in Sourcing Journal. “If a subscriber loves something to death, she can buy it at a discount for keeps. Otherwise, she can keep garments circulating in an eternally refreshed ‘closet in the cloud’ with virtually infinite options yet zero commitments.”

Jim Hilt, Express executive vice president and chief customer experience officer, explains that this allows customers to tap the company’s “full assortment and styling services without breaking the budget.”

In addition to this kind of flexibility and cost savings, sharing clothes eliminates the hassle of shopping malls and the time spent packing bags for donation — not to mention all those minutes staring at our wardrobes trying to decide if an item still sparks joy.

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Shifting business models

Until very recently, most of us would never have considered staying in some random person’s home while on vacation, let alone sharing a sweater with a bunch of strangers. Yet today, Airbnb averages 425,000 guests per night — nearly 22 percent more than Hilton Worldwide.

“The data shows, renting and sharing are becoming increasingly popular alternatives,” the PwC report asserts. “Executives will be wise to assess the role of their product and brand in this model — are you squarely a purveyor of goods, or are you an enabler?”

For those supply chain managers bracing for change and facing some tough calls concerning clothing lifespans; quality control of shared garments; and logistics economics, especially for lower-cost items, there is some good news. The sharing economy is also flourishing in the education space, with LinkedIn Learning, Grow with Google, and a seemingly infinite number of instructive and informative videos on YouTube. Our own channel is bursting at the seams with customer success stories, webinars, research, annual conference sessions, and a multitude of supply chain education tailored to fit just right.

To join ASCM, joint membership is available through Australasian Supply Chain Institute for just $440 per annum. Visit our website for a full list of membership benefits.

Indian regulations rain on Amazon and Walmart’s e-commerce parade

By ASCM CEO Abe Eshkenazi, CSCP, CPA, CAE

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Amazon and Walmart subsidiary Flipkart is scrambling to revamp its supply chains, vendor relationships and systems. New regulations from the world’s fastest growing economy have undermined these retailers’ business models and obstructed their sales in India’s burgeoning e-commerce sector.

Previously, foreign companies were forbidden from holding their own online inventory and shipping it directly to customers. Amazon had found a workaround in the form of local subsidiaries of firms in which it had holdings, which opponents insisted was violating the spirit of the rule. Largely due to such proxy sellers, Amazon and Walmart had controlled almost 80 percent of India’s e-commerce.

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But as of February 1, such goods are not permitted for sale by foreign companies. In addition, these firms are barred from entering into exclusive online sales agreements. A vendor’s inventory also will be considered under the control of an e-commerce marketplace if more than one-quarter of its sales are derived there.

The protectionist move follows ongoing complaints from domestic retailers over anticompetitive practices. Amazon and Walmart both requested a six-month postponement of the effective date but were denied.

“Thousands of products were pulled from Amazon.com Inc.’s India website Friday — the first direct impact from the country’s new e-commerce rules,” writes Corinne Abrams in the Wall Street Journal. The article goes on to explain that the restrictions are the latest effort by India to curb U.S. tech giants’ dominance in the country and “promote homegrown companies” as Prime Minister Narendra Modi seeks a second term.

“Both Amazon and Walmart have made big bets in India, where the e-commerce market is estimated to balloon to $72 billion in 2022,” Abrams adds. “Amazon has pledged to invest $5 billion to expand in [India], while Walmart’s takeover of India’s Flipkart for $16 billion was its biggest acquisition ever.”

Global supply chain know-how

The operations of these e-commerce giants have been thrown into disarray. As these companies, and others, navigate such severe regulatory pressure, success will hinge upon the effectiveness, responsiveness and flexibility of their supply chains.

ASCM provides the resources you need to plot your own course through the ever-shifting global marketplace. The APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) program enables individuals to master the fundamentals of supply chain strategy, business model design, relationship-building, risk management and much more. In particular, the CSCP learning system includes a module centered around monetary, regulatory and trade considerations; negotiation and collaboration; and international standards and compliance. Begin your journey toward this world-class certification today.

The Australasian Supply Chain Institute (ASCI) is the Premier Channel Partner for APICS and offers joint memberships with ASCI for local and ASCM for global membership for both corporates and individuals. Contact us today at http://www.asci.org.au/membership or enquiries@asci.org.au.

Nufarm site visit generates sharing

As part of the ASCI Site Visit Series, ASCI arranged for 14 ASCI Members to visit the Nufarm Raymond Rd manufacturing facility on Friday 25 January 2019.

Both nbn Co and Nufarm are ASCI Corporate Members, and within the ASCI Corporate Membership package, comes the benefit of sharing and learning within the network.

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Site Manager, George Fletcher gave the group an introduction to Nufarm and the site, see picture.

According to Angus Borland, Supply Chain Planning Manager – ANZ, Nufarm, the group enjoyed the balmy 44 degrees for a walk through a number of the production lines, followed by a planning discussion he led alongside two site planners (Michael Buttigieg-Raymond Rd and Matt Calabro-Pipe Rd).

“This was a good 2-way discussion between Nufarm and nbn Co,” Angus recalls.

Ryan Jones, Manager Integrated Demand Planning, nbn Co agrees. “The two organisations couldn’t be further apart in terms of industry. However, there were so many similarities both in forecasting and planning systems; S&OP processes; safety; and challenges such as demand accuracy and the management of inventory,” he said.

“In addition, we could really appreciate the weather challenges faced by the organisation and were impressed with Nufarm’s long term strategies and predictive analysis.”

There were some key areas identified where a visit to non Co could benefit the Nufarm demand planners. Hence, the sharing and learning process is in motion!

Look out for more events within the ASCI Site Visit Series, held all over the country in 2019!

 

Blockchain unlocked for supply chain

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Extract from Supply Chain Management Review

It can be hard for many people to understand what makes a blockchain different from a traditional database. So while the potential opportunities may be huge, the practical reality is that introducing a new technology like blockchain into a large, global organisation takes time, planning, and – most of all – the buy-in of decision-makers throughout the organisation.

ASCI loves free online learning tools for supply chain management!

Here, the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) has developed a free, interactive tool to help supply chain management professionals learn about blockchain and its potential uses. AFIT recently published a live blockchain application that can be accessed from any computer or smart phone, along with a complementary series of tutorial videos that walk learners through a blockchain simulation.

Daniel Stanton, founder of SecureMarking and author of Supply Chain Management for Dummies takes us through AFIT Blockchain for Supply Chain Demonstrations. These include six short “How To” videos on blockchain. It includes links with real time dashboards to practice blockchain software as Daniel walks you through the scenario.

An interesting feature of this demonstration is that it tracks the entire lifecycle of a component – from its point of manufacture to its eventual decommissioning and disposal. This is important because many supply chains now face a challenge of having used products re-introduced and sold as new by unscrupulous businesses. These used products can lead to costly problems such as unexpected breakdowns of equipment. In some situations, tracking decommissioning could also be useful for ensuring that hazardous materials are properly disposed of, or that re-usable components are properly recycled.

VIDEO 1 – An introduction

VIDEO 2 – A military scenario

VIDEO 3 – Create Secmark tokens

VIDEO 4 – Transferring Assets

VIDEO 5 – Decommissioning

VIDEO 6 – Wrap Up

In the process of developing this scenario, the team faced some of the basic decisions that any company will need to address when designing a blockchain. For example:
• Will the blockchain be public, allowing anyone to join, or will it be private, meaning only pre-approved companies can participate in transactions?
• What activities will each company in the blockchain be allowed to perform?
• Will participation be compulsory or will there need to be an incentive structure?
• How much visibility will each company have into the overall supply chain?

Invest in your professional learning and commit some of your commute times to learning some of this exciting technology!

This blog is an extract from Supply Chain Management Review. See full article here.

Embracing the IOT

By APICS CEO Abe Eshkenazi, CSCP, CPA, CAE

We keep hearing about the potential of the Internet of Things (IOT), but how will it help supply chain professionals specifically? Last week, Industrial Distribution ran “Improving Process Flows in the Delivery System through the Internet of Things,” which outlines the practical applications of IOT.

“As the development and deployment of the IOT capabilities continues to expand, [transportation and logistics] companies could eventually have visibility into every operation across the entire supply chain, from the source of the raw materials to the end use of the product,” writes Thomas Schied, vice president and director of asset management for TD Band Equipment Finance.

IOT connects devices to the internet and collects data, but Schied stresses the value is in knowing how, when and where to use the data. Predictive analytics enables business leaders to make calculations that will increase efficiencies, reduce spending and improve overall processes. For example, data from sensors can be combined with historical data to establish when assets need to be replaced. Likewise, transportation and logistics companies can use sensor data and geographic and environmental information to customize truck maintenance plans.

Further, IOT data and analytics supports organizational decision making, as experts alter routes to prevent bottlenecks at loading docks and changing inventory locations. This information improves on-time delivery and reduces fuel and labor costs.

With all the promises of IOT, Schied does mention likely challenges. These include the potential of security breaches, a reallocation of current jobs and business disruption.

“Additionally, the IOT is expensive and time consuming to implement, and the more parts of a business that are integrated into an IOT system, the more disruptions that business could face,” Schied writes. “However, integration can be conducted in stages over the course of several years.”

He adds, “As we see logistics and supply chains become more complex, implementation of IOT is necessary.”

We’ve transformed our business to help transform yours

IOT is one example of how the world of supply chain is rapidly evolving. Technological advances combined with a renewed focus on sustainability and more, make staying ahead of the curve a challenge for corporations. That’s where we come in. In January 2019, we are officially launching the Association for Supply Chain Management (ASCM). This is more than a new name or a rebrand, this is an entirely new association. With ASCM, we expand our reach and broaden our impact, becoming the leader on all things supply chain. Plus, we’ll still do what we’ve always done — give your supply chain team the tools they need to advance their careers and create value for your company.

Abe Eshkenazi
APICS CEO

Top five supply chain podcasts of 2018

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Australasian Supply Chain Institute has reviewed podcasts interviews all over the globe to bring you the very best for your listening pleasure over the holiday break:

1.The Future of Work

Jacqui Canney, is EVP and Chief People Officer at Walmart and Clay Johnson, is EVP and Chief Information Officer at Walmart.

Jacqui is focused on the development, the retention and the rewarding of their 2 million employees. Clay is charged with putting ICT and HR together to create more productivity and automation. Walmart is the world’s largest employer with 5000 stores in the U.S and 10,000 globally.

Duration: 1 hour

ASCI review: An unbeatable interview on how Walmart is evolving and using tech to train and up skill their workforce; how they are using Blockchain to track food; what the future of Walmart looks like 5-10 years out. An interview just darn worth your time. 

2. ASCI Lounge

Daniel Kohut, Director, Solutions Advisor at JDA, shares his sales and operations planning expertise starting from his Australian career pathway, to the present day and the importance of professional development for supply chain experts in the midst of an era of digitisation transformation.

Duration: 20 minutes

ASCI review: So great to hear the Aussie accent and someone so passionate about the future of supply chain careers. Some good advice for professional development. 

3. Talking Logistics

Scroll straight to Episode 6: Angie Freeman, Chief Human Resources Officer, CH Robinson shares insights and ideas on the importance of recruitment and talent in the supply chain industry.

Duration: 29 mins

ASCI review: Best take on articulating the challenges in a succinct interview.

4. Supply Chain Now

Sandra MacQuillan serves as the Senior Director of Supply Chain Strategy & Transformation for Kimberly-Clark, where she leads company’s global supply chain, with responsibility for procurement, logistics, manufacturing, quality, safety, and sustainability.

Amy Gray serves as HR Director for Global Supply Chain at Kimberly-Clark. Amy has served in a variety of HR-related roles at K-C over the last 12 years, to include HR Business Partner and HR Project Leader.

Duration: 1 hour

ASCI review: Jump to 18 minutes in..the first part is just chatter. Interesting take on diversity to better represent customer profiles and global reach.

5. ASCI Lounge

Indrasen Naidoo, Director, Supply Chain System Transformation, Roy Hill (a 55 mega tonne per annum iron ore producer in Western Australia), joins us on the ASCI Lounge to reflect on Roy Hill’s roadmap for Intelligent Supply Chain for Assets, highlighting the need for leadership capacity; rethinking flows; and applying expert technology.

Duration: 20 minutes

ASCI review: Some salient points on how supply chain in Australia is stuck in traditional programs and what Roy Hill has done to move the dial. 

Enjoy your holiday podcast listening!

ASCI Lounge is Australasia’s supply chain podcast channel with over 3,500 downloads since 2016. To book an interview, or to join a panel discussion on a particular topic, email the ASCI National Office at enquiries@asci.org.au

ASCI National Office is closed from Friday 21 December however, you can purchase Guided Learning registration right up until 6 January 2019. For more information, visit: www.asci.org.au/education 

Monique Fenech is the host of the ASCI Lounge podcast channel.

 

 

 

Danone’s story from RAAF Challenge – ASCI Leadership Series

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Pictured from left: Brendan Iddles (Danone) and Henry Brunekreef, President, ASCI

Photo courtesy of Royal Australian Air Force

by Brendan Iddles

When my planning team mates emailed me that they had signed us up for the ASCI Leadership challenge, I thought to myself … Wow, that sounds awesome! But as it was a really busy period in the office I didn’t think much more about it.

As the day drew closer, and we filled in the induction forms for the RAAF base at Richmond, things started to get real – What would we have to do? Would we just stare at each other blankly in confusion? Would we look foolish in front of the other corporate and military teams? Would we avoid talking about it in the office the next day?

Well the day finally arrived, three of us carpooled out to the base, while our fourth team member drove from home. After a nervous 15 minutes waiting as our fourth team member struggled through Sydney morning traffic – we made the bus and entered the RAAF base.

The first thing that struck us was the historical feel of the Richmond base. Originally a military flying school opened in 1916, the RAAF base was established in 1925 and some of the original buildings and gates are still visible.

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After a brief safety induction on site, we were issued our “Disaster Scenario” documents and treated to a “ride” in the RAAFs Hercules aircraft simulator. To the background hum of engine and other in-flight sounds we familiarised ourselves with the natural disaster scenario set before us and the goals we had to achieve.

After “landing”, we moved to the officers mess to get down to business. As a group, we had to devise a recovery plan to save 5000 lives, cut off by floodwaters in a coastal town in far north Queensland, using a set resource list supplied by the Australian military forces, in only an hour.

I loved the ODGQ (old dead guy quote) from General George S Patton – “A good plan today is better than a perfect plan tomorrow”, which roughly translates to “don’t wait for inspiration, when immediate action is required”.

With two planning specialists on the job calculating flight times and nautical distances to ensure that each resource would arrive at the appropriate time to meet the set goals, and two logistics guys optimising resources and movements to have the right resource in the right place at the right time, we literally had our heads down for the whole hour to develop the best solution to the problem.

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Some “out of the box” thinking around domestic resources available in an isolated mining town really helped the execution plan. In the end, after a thorough review from our RAAF senior leadership hosts, Team Danone walked away with the trophy, much to our collective surprise.

This was a fantastic networking opportunity, expertly hosted by the RAAF, and a really fun day.

Huge thanks to ASCI, RAAF base Richmond and Oracle for organising, hosting and sponsoring the event. Looking forward to defending the trophy next year!

For more information about becoming an ASCI Corporate Member or participating in the ASCI Leadership Series, contact the ASCI National Office on enquiries@asci.org.au or visit the ASCI website.

 

Digital Transformation of Supply Chain Planning

Henry Canitz, Director of Product Marketing & Business Development, Logility

In almost every new supply chain focused industry periodical, you will find an article discussing transformation or digitization. Industry analysts, consultants, solution providers, executives and practitioners are all focused on how to transition from traditional to more “digital” planning capabilities. In fact, a Google search using the words, “Digital Transformation” yields 2,800,000+ results. As a supply chain practitioner it is critical to understand what digital supply chain planning looks like and how to ensure your supply chain is on the right transformational path.

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What is Digital Transformation?

Digital Transformation involves a focused effort of activity across multiple processes that accelerates performance and delivers new value-added capabilities. Digital Transformation in supply chain planning usually involves development of new tools, skills, and/or processes that target a step change in speed and/or agility.

Why is Digital Transformation Important?

Digital transformation is one of the top concerns and areas of focus for C-Level executives. There is a growing awareness within senior executives that transforming supply chain planning capabilities to take advantage of the emerging areas of “Big Data,” “Artificial Intelligence,” “Advanced Analytics,”  and “Cloud Computing” is a competitive imperative.

Most supply chain managers already know that there is a “War for Talent” being fought to find and retain qualified supply chain personal. Today there is only one qualified supply chain candidate for every seven planning openings and this ratio is projected to increase before it gets better. The best supply chain planning candidates want to work with advanced technology platforms that allow them to spend more time analyzing problems and developing value-added recommendations. Digital transformation of supply chain planning capabilities is critical to hiring and retaining the best talent.

Supply chain practitioners are being asked to accomplish more with less, to be involved in more business processes and deliver more value-added capabilities while lowering costs and ensuring high customer service. Materials and components are sourced from ever-more remote locations and finished products are being sold into expanding regions and channels. The amount of external data continues to grow at exponential rates. Planning cycles continue to shrink and customers expect shorter and shorter delivery cycles.  All these pressures demand a step change in performance building the need for Digital Transformation.

As a Supply Chain Practitioner, How Can I Facilitate a Digital Transformation?

The first step is to obtain C-Level sponsorship. Unlike most supply chain improvement efforts focused on managing and maintaining the current state and making incremental improvements, transformation involves multi-year, multi-functional, disruptive, and expensive efforts that can only be accomplished when embraced by top company executives. Often to gain executive approval requires a business case showing substantial hard and soft benefits.

Start with documenting the “As-Is” process capabilities and corresponding key performance metrics. This will lay the foundation for any future performance comparison and provide the starting point to develop benefits for transformation. Envision the “To-Be” process capabilities and desired performance metrics through benchmarking, group brain storming sessions, and alignment to business strategy and direction. Include envisioned capability cases to provide a vision of what the “To-Be” environment might look like. Develop a flexible roadmap with critical milestones required to transition from the “As-Is” state to the “To-Be” vision. The trick is to have enough detail in this transition plan to execute against while still maintaining flexibility to adjust to new priorities and emerging technologies.

The skills people need to operate in the envisioned “To-Be” environment will be drastically different requiring training and education. Some employees will find it impossible to make the transition requiring the hiring of new talent. A dedicated focus on change management and employee development is necessary for successful transformation.

Conclusion:

The move to digital business capabilities is affecting all areas of a company including the supply chain. Today, technologies such as RFID, GPS, and sensors have enabled organizations to transform their existing supply chain execution capabilities to be more flexible, open, agile, and collaborative. This same type of transformation from embracing digital capabilities is starting to take place in Supply Chain Planning.

To be truly competitive in an increasingly volatile world, forward-thinking companies will need to transform its supply chain planning capabilities by investing in digital supply chain planning capabilities to improve customer service, reduce costs, and enable company strategies. This new vision of a digitally transformed supply chain has caught the attention of executive management and supply chain practitioners must step up and meet this digital transformation challenge.

 

Additional Reading

Five reasons why the APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) could be your most audacious career move yet

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More than 25,000 supply chain practitioners have studied the APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) to master the essential technology, concepts, and strategies related to end-to-end supply chain operations. Here’s how it can benefit your career in 2019:

  1. Get promoted by developing unique solutions for the end-to-end supply chain like Arsalan Hussain who after studying CSCP, designed a management dashboard with end-to-end data and KPI visibility which was used by management for reporting. Arsalan was transferred to Procurement and Analytics and within two years promoted to Manager of Supply Chain. On average CSCP designees see a 12% pay increase and improve their hiring potential by 65%.
  2. Gain new ways to collaborate with partners like Maria Petrochenkova who after CSCP, developed the skills to effectively couple strategic buyers with product managers to drive innovation.
  3. Grow prospects for general management roles like Kuban Chetty whose finance background and CSCP study honed his skills to implement productivity initiatives around total supply chain, incorporating planning and operations management. He became confident in running financial scenarios around total supply chain activities and implement productivity initiatives focused on factory planning and highlighting capacity usages.
  4. Lead initiatives where supply chain is the business enabler like Nate Joliff who  after studying CSCP applied it to capture key data on extended database processes for racks and container design which helped minimise transportation and storage costs by 15%, saving US$2.3M to the bottom line.
  5. Bolster evidence for Practitioner Registration eligibility. ASCI’s newly launched Practitioner Registrations for Procurement, Logistics and Operations Management require eligibility through evidence of relevant certifications, qualifications and work experience. According to Dr Pieter Nagel, ASCI’s CEO-Professionalisation, the APICS CSCP is a favourable component for eligibility for registration and furthermore provides a significant knowledge base for examination preparation for the Professional Registration to be made available in 2019.
What’s more, you can now tap into accessible and affordable study options via self study and ASCI Guided Learning two hourly weekly sessions online either within the weekday or week evening as part of ASCI’s online pilot program with APICS! Register to 2019 classes before December 2018 and you’ll receive $100 savings. For more information, please contact us via enquiries@asci.org.au