Marketing teams are discovering great brand stories in supply chain

Jennifer K Daniels
Vice President, Marketing, APICS

The number of CMOs becoming more knowledgeable and enthusiastic about supply chain management is increasing as leading companies lean on supply chain attributes to position, promote and differentiate products, services and brands.  If you’re a marketer looking for a great story to tell about your company—one that will capture the hearts and minds of a generation of customers—you may need to look no further than your supply chain.

While product marketing and sales teams have always worked with supply chain to balance supply and demand and ensure a positive customer experience, the corporate marketing teams are waking up to the power of supply chain performance.  Supply chain performance is a big deal, a big differentiator, and a game-changer that can dictate the difference between generations of locked-in loyal customers and lost customers for life.

In the past, marketing leaders dug in to supply chain particulars when there was an issue that affected marketing—like a product recall or stockout over the holidays; or an environmental or social issue that might negatively impact the brand; or when there was a risk challenge that required public relations support, like a plant closure, natural disaster or political unrest.

But now, as the supply chain becomes more integral to competitive advantage, profitable growth and sustainable practices, a growing number of CMOs are recognizing that a high-performing supply chain is an important differentiator, and they are incorporating supply chain capabilities into messaging, campaigns, loyalty programs and even events. They are aware of the impact the supply chain can have on their brand—both positive and negative­—and they take proactive measures to protect and promote it.

To the visionary CMO, the supply chain doesn’t run in the background. The supply chain is part of the story. It is part of the customer experience and an ingredient in the brand promise. It’s become a visible component in the marketing mix.

Excellent examples of marketing that weave in supply chain stories abound.  Remember the Ralph Lauren sweaters for the Sochi Winter Olympics? They were the flagship product for Ralph Lauren’s “Made in America” line of apparel for the athletes, rolled out with the story of the Oregon ranchers who raise the sheep and shear the wool, and all the steps in the supply chain required to provide the red, white and blue yarn for the sweaters.  An example of a supply chain inspired marketing event is Amazon Prime Day, when Amazon marketed its Prime subscription service through a rotating lineup of retail specials and same-day shipping that showed off its supply chain supremacy. And there’s the ongoing Jimmy John restaurants’ “Freaky Fast” campaign that’s not just about speedy sandwich delivery, but also embodies an entire corporate culture and its nimble supply chain of fresh ingredients.

Beyond the aforementioned high-visibility examples, there’s the almost endless number of companies offering personalization options (pick your color, add that monogram, design the perfect product just for you!) enabled by supply chain mass customization and make-to-order flexibility. If you’re a marketer and you haven’t been thinking about supply chain, it’s time to start.  Your supply chain is – or could be – a key chapter in your brand story or the attribute that that turns your customers into evangelists.

Is your CMO forging a more strategic relationship with the supply chain organization? If not, can the supply chain manager reach out to marketing to begin such a partnership? How could your firm’s supply chain performance be leveraged as a marketing tool? Weigh in with your thoughts.

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The Two Levers of Inventory Optimisation

By Henry Canitz, Director of Product Marketing & Business Development , Logility

When I hear the term “Lever” my mechanical engineering side comes out and I think of the Physics and Mechanical Design courses I took some 30+ years ago. Although I didn’t appreciate it at the time, my engineering education laid a strong foundation that has helped me be as successful as possible in whatever I did. More than anything, I learned how to analyse and solve problems. So when I think of a lever I think of a rigid bar resting on a pivot or fulcrum, used to help move a heavy or a firmly fixed load with one end when pressure is applied to the other.

Back to present day and the supply chain. Two powerful levers a company can use to optimise inventory are “Working Capital” and “Customer Service Levels.” Through the effective use of these levers, you can free trapped working capital while improving service levels.

Your company’s inventory efficient frontier is a tradeoff curve between working capital and service level and represents the currently achievable service level at any corresponding inventory investment. At its most basic, start with a piece of graph paper and plot your current service level on the x-axis and current inventory level on the y-axis. Chances are you are not on the inventory efficiency curve that is theoretically possible given your current operating capabilities. When you remove inefficiencies, failures, etc. and estimate how much your service level will go up and down with changes in inventory investment you end up with a curve – your current inventory efficient frontier curve. Organisations can slide up and down along this curve by manipulating the service and inventory levers (see Figure 1).

Picture1

However to create real value you have to be able to shift the inventory efficient frontier so that higher service levels can be achieved without increasing inventory or the same service levels can be achieved with less inventory. Multi-echelon Inventory Optimisation (MEIO) allows you to truly optimise your inventory across the entire supply chain and enables you to shift to a new efficient frontier for your entire supply chain (Read the eBook: The Inventory Optimization Handbook).

By modeling the end-to-end supply chain, MEIO determines not only the optimal inventory to carry at each location but also at which locations each item should be carried. MEIO looks across sales channels, distribution tiers, and even types of inventory (raw, WIP, FG) to understand how best to minimise total inventory while still providing the desired customer service levels. MEIO can take you into unexplored territory providing reductions in working capital of up to 30 percent or more. For most companies that amounts to millions of dollars in savings annually. That is an impressive use of levers.

What is important to understand is that the supply chain is a living, breathing and constantly changing organism. Your optimal inventory strategy for this month might be suboptimal next month due to changes in demand or supply, changes in competition or market health, or a variety of other factors. Modeling your end-to-end supply chain inventory is not a “one and done” activity and therefore there is always opportunity to shift that efficient frontier into new and undiscovered territory.

Do you understand your company’s service level – working capital tradeoff? Can you model your end-to-end supply chain to determine your optimal inventory locations and levels?

Hank Canitz Picture

Henry Canitz, Director of Product Marketing & Business Development, Logility

 

 

ASCI members enjoy lessons in surviving and thriving in Australia’s manufacturing industry

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Site Visit Report by Geoff Palm
When Sten Campbell, Director, designtech, and his wife bought the business 25 years ago they had no idea about making furniture. Thanks to the help from a mentor and competitor in Sydney, they began the journey to where they are today; one of the leading manufacturers of MTS and MTO furniture manufacturers in Australia.
They have both local and national customers and compete effectively with imported products. One of designtec’s advantage is in quality, with a 10 year guarantee on all their products. They have not had a single claim against their product since this warranty was put in place. Another advantage is their speed to market; being able to deliver orders within 2 weeks. In fact, they recently helped out a Fitout company that was in trouble due to a delayed overseas shipment and late completion penalties approaching.
designtec has invested in state of the art German machinery, which is in part, one of the reasons they are so competitive. We watched one machine in action that cut, trimmed and edged a tabletop in minutes. This used to take 2 tradespeople up to 3 hours each to complete in the past. It was fascinating watching the journey of the product from raw material to finished product; created by a combination of people and machine. Staff skill levels range from tradespeople to semi-skilled; with a strong focus on cross-training. This ensures that most people in the business can operate a range of equipment; allowing for flexibility when demand dictates.
Safety is another important factor in designtec’s success; with no LTIs in the last 5 years.
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Most of there employees are now long term; with some coming up to 20 years. This was not the case during the mining boom when Western Australia struggled to find qualified people and it was the same with designtec; growing at 30% a year. That all changed in 2008 with the GFC and then the end of the mining boom, which saw demand for their product diminish rapidly. It is to the owners credit that not only did they survive, met the challenge they faced and have prospered since the downturn.
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The visit was hosted by Sten and Hannah Witherick, General Manager, on the afternoon of July 24, ASCI and associates learned the commercial, technical, industry and logistics issues around the designtec business.
ASCI WA thanks designtec, Sten Campbell, Hannah Witherick and other staff for hosting this visit and openly sharing their stories with our members. We must also not forget the office dog, who shared her love with all in a quiet and dignified manner. – end

U.K.’s Carbon Dioxide Shortage Creates Concern for Meat, Beer and Crumpet Supply

By APICS CEO, Abe Eshkenazi
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Digital supply chain transformation: real and viable or just tech hype?

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The words “digital transformation” may appear to your colleagues as just the next tech hype. After all, weren’t we all just talking about cloud?

But just like cloud, digital transformation is real and viable — and here to stay.

Sure, but what is digital transformation exactly? There are as many definitions as there are pundits and luminaries. Infor President Duncan Angove talks about it this way: Digital transformation is about closing the gap between what your DIGITAL customers expect and what your ANALOG organisation can actually deliver. The aim of digital transformation is to go beyond merely automating a process or reducing costs, and to differentiate a company in significant ways from its competitors.

“Software and technology is disrupting every industry we look at,” Angove says. Whether it’s Uber in transportation or Airbnb in hostelry, every industry is being disrupted by the application of technology.

“Infor is at an interesting intersection, because we are a software cloud technology company that understands industries. So companies are coming to us, asking how we can help them navigate this digital disruption and take advantage of it.”

Here are just a few examples:

DSW – developing a strategy for a fresh customer experience

Nordstrom – creating a converged commerce experience for customers

Travis Perkins – delivering a variety of strategic, technical, and financial benefits

Fuller’s – deploying cloud software as the basis of a radical business process transformation to drive growth

Echoing these customers, Infor recently hosted groups of executives from the US and Europe to discuss digital transformation. Representing manufacturing, financial services, consumer packaged goods (CPG), retail, and media and entertainment all said their organisations have digital initiatives under way.

Within digital, three common themes emerged: executive leadership is essential; employee skills have to keep pace; and the data deluge must be harnessed into actionable insights. Here is a summary of one of the events.

So, where should your company start? Get inspired here.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

Marketing teams are discovering great brand stories in supply chain

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The number of CMOs becoming more knowledgeable and enthusiastic about supply chain management is increasing as leading companies lean on supply chain attributes to position, promote and differentiate products, services and brands.  If you’re a marketer looking for a great story to tell about your company—one that will capture the hearts and minds of a generation of customers—you may need to look no further than your supply chain.

While product marketing and sales teams have always worked with supply chain to balance supply and demand and ensure a positive customer experience, the corporate marketing teams are waking up to the power of supply chain performance.  Supply chain performance is a big deal, a big differentiator, and a game-changer that can dictate the difference between generations of locked-in loyal customers and lost customers for life.

In the past, marketing leaders dug in to supply chain particulars when there was an issue that affected marketing—like a product recall or stockout over the holidays; or an environmental or social issue that might negatively impact the brand; or when there was a risk challenge that required public relations support, like a plant closure, natural disaster or political unrest.

But now, as the supply chain becomes more integral to competitive advantage, profitable growth and sustainable practices, a growing number of CMOs are recognizing that a high-performing supply chain is an important differentiator, and they are incorporating supply chain capabilities into messaging, campaigns, loyalty programs and even events. They are aware of the impact the supply chain can have on their brand—both positive and negative­—and they take proactive measures to protect and promote it.

To the visionary CMO, the supply chain doesn’t run in the background. The supply chain is part of the story. It is part of the customer experience and an ingredient in the brand promise. It’s become a visible component in the marketing mix.

Excellent examples of marketing that weave in supply chain stories abound.  Remember the Ralph Lauren sweaters for the Sochi Winter Olympics? They were the flagship product for Ralph Lauren’s “Made in America” line of apparel for the athletes, rolled out with the story of the Oregon ranchers who raise the sheep and shear the wool, and all the steps in the supply chain required to provide the red, white and blue yarn for the sweaters.  An example of a supply chain inspired marketing event is Amazon Prime Day, when Amazon marketed its Prime subscription service through a rotating lineup of retail specials and same-day shipping that showed off its supply chain supremacy. And there’s the ongoing Jimmy John restaurants’ “Freaky Fast” campaign that’s not just about speedy sandwich delivery, but also embodies an entire corporate culture and its nimble supply chain of fresh ingredients.

Beyond the aforementioned high-visibility examples, there’s the almost endless number of companies offering personalization options (pick your color, add that monogram, design the perfect product just for you!) enabled by supply chain mass customization and make-to-order flexibility. If you’re a marketer and you haven’t been thinking about supply chain, it’s time to start.  Your supply chain is – or could be – a key chapter in your brand story or the attribute that that turns your customers into evangelists.

Is your CMO forging a more strategic relationship with the supply chain organisation? If not, can the supply chain manager reach out to marketing to begin such a partnership? How could your firm’s supply chain performance be leveraged as a marketing tool? Weigh in with your thoughts. Read more

 

Meet our guest blogger:

jennifer

Jennifer K Daniels
Vice President, Marketing, APICS

Digital transformation that drives progress

digital transformation brain

Henry Miller once said “Whatever there be of progress in life comes not through adaptation but through daring.” To a large extent, that holds true in the business world today.

Many companies struggle with processes that can’t keep up with the pace of change, outdated business models, and an inability to stay competitive in a rapidly evolving global market. While adapting to these types of changes may be enough to keep the lights on, rarely does it lead to differentiation. What these companies need is to transform their business in a disruptive way that drives progress. We believe that digital transformation can lead to the kind of progress that can make a difference for a business, its customers, its industry, and the world at large.

But what exactly is “digital transformation”? Chances are you’ve been hearing the phrase bandied about; but you may not know what exactly it means—or why you should care. CIO.com defines digital transformation as “the acceleration of business activities, processes, competencies, and models to fully leverage the changes and opportunities of digital technologies and their impact in a strategic and prioritised way.” But more than just acceleration, digital transformation is about the need for businesses to outpace digital disruption and stay competitive in a rapidly evolving business environment.

At its core, digital transformation is all about disruption. Whether that disruption is beneficial or devastating depends entirely upon where you find yourself on the wave—at the crest or at the bottom. To embrace digital transformation, you need to make it part of your corporate DNA. You need to start figuring out:

* How to uncover the pockets of innovation in your company—and turn them into opportunities for organisational and go-to-market transformation

* How you can put the structure in place to support digital transformation—and make it sustainable

* How to create a clear digital vision with a strategy for digital transformation

* How to harness data science to drive transformation

* How to position your employees and your organisation to successfully execute a digital transformation strategy

Find help here on how to get started on your own digital transformation.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

Tomorrow’s Supply Chains

shaun_tomorrows_supply_chainsIt’s an exciting time to work in the field of supply chain. There’s a sense of change in the air – an awareness of the future unfolding. There are thought leaders who think we’re headed for a ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’, an era of sustainable, socially conscious enterprises, underpinned by the intelligent interconnection of software and machines. For decision makers along the supply chain, it’s time for research – and for vision.  In many instances, the adoption (or non-adoption) of today’s technologies will determine who thrives and who dies along the supply chains of tomorrow.

Let’s take a look at some of these converging technologies, and consider their application along the supply chain.

The Cloud

For small- to medium-sized businesses, access to the new competitive toolkit is taking place on the Cloud. Even beyond price considerations (which are significant) unlocking the power of nascent technologies makes the adoption of Cloud services a logical step in the evolution of most organizations. There are still good reasons to choose on premise or hybrid solutions, but extending the reach of an ERP to include data external to the company (such as weather, demographics, machine and sensor data), makes better sense on the Cloud.

There are more advantages to the Cloud than are dreamt of in anyone’s philosophy, but to my mind, the Cloud’s ability to facilitate highly collaborative ecosystems is exceptionally powerful. Both responsiveness and efficiency are enhanced by the flow of real-time data, which can help to minimize operational misalignment at the interface of supply chain stages.

Big Data and Advanced Analytics

By 2021 there will be more than 35 zettabytes of online data. For those who haven’t a clue what a zettabyte is (myself included) that’s 35,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes of information. That’s an impressive amount of data, and most of it is unstructured, meaning that before the advent of Big Data it was largely inaccessible to computers. These days, with Big Data analytics programs, all that unstructured data can be collected, organized, and analyzed. This facilitates unprecedented accuracy and clarity of data, opening the door to better planning and decision-making.

Artificial Intelligence (AI)

When I think of AI, my mind wanders to Star Trek’s Data, rapidly processing technical information from the Enterprise’s computer, and instantly recommending a course of action. While we’re not quite ready to staff our distribution centres with androids, the capabilities of Artificial Intelligence will have enormous benefits along the supply chain. AI-driven ‘chatbots’ are already improving the User Experience for customers of shipping companies, making it  easier to find store locations, determine shipping rates and track packages.

AI can draw insight from enormous data sets. That promises more accurate forecasting and lower market mediation costs (fewer stock-outs and mark-downs) – a major profit eater for innovative product manufacturers. Unprecedented control over data will allow for fine tuning, helping to tighten up end-to-end visibility, time-to-market, and overall agility. AI can also serve as a bridge between supply chains, facilitating a seamless flow of transactions. Of course, the most visible manifestation of AI, along with chatbots, will be fleets of autonomous delivery vehicles.

Robots & Cobots

Industrial robots are nothing new, but their presence along the supply chain is growing. When material handling is better handed off to a machine, especially in dangerous situations, or when precision is required, benefits in efficiency, responsiveness and safety naturally accrue.

What I find particularly interesting is the movement towards ‘cobots’, smaller, less expensive, more flexible robots that work side-by-side with humans. Cobots are becoming popular for pick and place, palletizing, and packaging. They will doubtless lead to significant reductions in turnaround times, and create increasingly responsive supply chains.

The Internet of Things (IoT)

The Internet of Things, sometimes referred to as the driver of Industry 4.0, ties together people, processes, data, and things, via a burgeoning universe of devices and sensors. Unlike older, ‘passive’ generations of sensors, IoT sensors are active. A connected pallet for example, can relay information on its whereabouts and condition. A connected machine can allow remote technicians to run diagnostics and initiate repair options, resulting in increased uptime and improved customer service. Importing data from IoT devices to an analytics platform will allow, for example, unprecedented stock control and precise inventory monitoring.

When it comes to transportation, IoT systems are already in use, optimizing fleet efficiencies through route planning, directing drivers to avoid traffic jams, maintaining temperatures for perishable goods,  and helping carriers reduce ‘deadheads’ (the time trucks run without cargo). In addition, IoT technologies such as RFID provide the ability to track products throughout the global supply chain.

Some of the most powerful uses of the IoT are in the area of customer behavior. In-store sensors can track traffic and shopping patterns to yield clear insights into consumer behaviour, improving brand engagement and increasing sales. This depth of intelligence into supply and demand will benefit everyone along the supply chain.

There are, of course, more technologies to talk about than can fit in a single blog. In my next offering, aimed to coincide with the release of SYSPRO Harmony, I’ll talk about Social Media, and the exciting new possibilities that are opening up for problem solving and collaboration along the supply chain.

About our Guest Blogger
Shaun Butler

shaun_butler_blog_image

Shaun Butler is the Regional CEO of SYSPRO Asia Pacific, having joined SYSPRO in 2003. Whilst Shaun is based in Singapore he spends a reasonable amount of time travelling throughout the rest of the region

Having spent more than 20 years in and around various ERP companies Shaun has found it refreshing to work in the SYSPRO environment, with long term employees who are committed and passionate about a single product.

Shaun’s role is broad and varied but in short he is responsible for the growth and strategic direction of SYSPRO across Asia and the Pacific. He is extremely proud of the company and the team SYSPRO has built, supported by the many customers who place their trust in SYSPRO’s solution and capability.

 

Digital supply chain transformation and customer-centricity

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Turning a digital business strategy into a reality remains elusive for many organizations. Even businesses that are forward thinking and have already begun developing a digital transformation strategy will find new gaps to fill and new challenges to address that didn’t exist last year in the areas of new regulations, new trade policies, and new customer demands, to name a few.

As a result, many businesses are recognizing that digitization is not only about improving business processes or automation. Digital transformation is about redefining business. It’s about wrapping services around products, or going a step further, replacing products with services.

Cloud technology is a catalyst to new business models, with data, digitization, and networks serving as the underlying core. When this is applied to a supply chain — where hundreds of people and parties impact the order, production, and delivery of goods — it spawns new ways for businesses to service customers.

Supply chains are rife with inefficiency, bottlenecks, and information silos. They tend to be set up as long, winding linear trails of business transactions. Data and visibility remain bottled up in each trading partner organization. This fragmented landscape has become inadequate in today’s world of always-on commerce and ultra-demanding customers. On the surface, there is low-hanging fruit in digitization of processes such as order management or supplier collaboration. But digital transformation possibilities run much deeper, into the foundational infrastructure of business-to-business commerce, where a network approach to business can deliver massive returns by finding new ways to deliver value to customers.

Transforming entire industry supply chains

Digital transformation is a broad term being probed and defined in multiple ways. In some industries, such as automotive, the movement is not so subtle — and more of a change locomotive. Disruptive factors such as connected cars and autonomous vehicles are reshaping the industry. The transformational vision for automotive companies is a new ecosystem of suppliers, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), dealers, and complementary services that enable new customer experiences and products to be delivered.

The industry is well on its way. Major players like Ford are investing heavily in technology. Ford just raised $2.8 billion to drive new innovation. The company has already committed to spending $4.5 billion to bolster a lineup of electric cars, with plans to release a fully autonomous car in 2021. The ability to integrate new innovations, technologies, and suppliers into the automotive ecosystem will be key to excelling in the future.

In retail, digital disruption is being spurred by immense pressure from consumers. And similar to auto, where outsiders like Uber and Tesla bring disruption, retail has been upended by the Amazons and Alibabas of the world. Consumers are accustomed to Walmart-like low costs and Amazonian convenience and delivery. As a result, retailers across all segments are being forced to be hyper-sensitive to consumers’ needs and wants. But competing with Amazon on delivery services while offering competitive pricing comes at a cost — to profitability.

Retailers recognize the need to transform how they order, produce, and deliver goods to be customer centric in new ways, while remaining profitable. New experiences and services are essential. Consider how retail is already evolving and leading to supply chain transformation. Some of the growing trends in shopping today include social shopping, pop-up stores, mobile commerce combined with trucks and vans, click-and-collect, personal shoppers, subscription-based shopping …

In-store, retailers are innovating as well. Ralph Lauren has introduced interactive touch-screen mirrors in its fitting rooms. IKEA has deployed virtual reality to allow shoppers to envision new rooms in their home. West Elm, a furniture provider owned by Williams Sonoma, has announced plans to open five hotels, which will act as showrooms where consumers can purchase goods.

Under pressure from nontraditional competitors and demanding consumers, the future supply chain relies on a network of manufacturers, suppliers, and service providers built around the customer to deliver new experiences, services and value.

2017 will sharpen focus on customer-centric commerce

The bounds of traditional business are being stretched. In 2017, we’ll see technology trends that go deeper into the reshaping of business models and further redefine industries.

Automotive companies are evolving into transportation service providers. Competition from non-traditional players raises the bar on technology and connectivity, forcing automakers to find new suppliers and partners that can deliver tech savvy innovation.

Retailers are evolving to deliver new forms of experience to the consumer. Competition from beyond the traditional industry is forcing retailers to get closer to customers through fast or free shipping, free and simple return programs, customized goods, and seamless order fulfillment from any shopping channel.

Consumer product brands like Tide are getting into homes with their detergent pods; consumers push a button from their laundry room to place an order. This bypasses the retailer and goes direct to the consumer.

In 2017, questions such as “What defines a true automotive company?” or “What defines a true retailer or consumer product company?” will have to be examined and redefined.

At the centre, of course, is the customer. Customers expect and demand more. Delivering on these expectations and fulfilling orders requires manufacturers and retailers to rewire the way they produce and deliver goods to their customers.

2017 looks to be a year of uncertainty and change. Social, technological, environmental, and political disruption will have massive impacts on commerce and supply chains. For businesses operating in nearly any industry, this means more pitfalls and challenges, accompanied by more pressing demands from customers. Companies and trading partners that fail to adapt are at risk.

Supply chains of the near future will have to operate as customer-centric networks. This should be the end state, or vision. Getting there requires a long road, starting with digital transformation.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

5 Benefits to learning via Virtual Classrooms

The future of education is content delivered via virtual classrooms, especially in Australia where the tyranny of distance and increased traffic congestion hinder the opportunities to learn in residential classrooms.  These virtual classrooms are held online where participates can communicate, view presentations and interact with facilitators and peers.  To sum it all up, virtual classrooms are very similar to traditional classrooms, where the teaching is still the same but it is delivered in a convenient format.

So, how can individuals benefit from these virtual classrooms?

  1. It is flexible, you can stay at your work desk and log on for a few hours.  You can participate in the lesson via a laptop, PC or tablet/iPad.  With just a few hours duration needed at a time for a virtual class, students do not have to take out a whole day for learning.  This benefits employers as well, as they avoid roster shuffling and extra staffing.
  2. Chat boxes and polls will be available during the class to allow students to interact as they would in a residential classroom.  Polls allow for facilitators to gauge the knowledge and understanding of the class.
  3. Similar to a traditional classroom, the facilitator is in control of the style of content delivery.  They are able to mute and un-mute students.  The facilitators can chose when question time is or when students can be interactive.  This gives the feel of the familiarity of a traditional classroom where the facilitator runs how the content is delivered.   As well as, gives the opportunity for students to share their stories.
  4. It allows participants to learn and be able to immediately applying what they learn to their job, while it is fresh on their mind.
  5. No cancellations – there are no limitations to numbers.

We hope these 5 benefits of virtual classrooms have given you a better understanding of the concept.

apicsAU has designed a series of Summer Virtual Classrooms which have been developed from the Best of the Best short course offerings from 2016.   View our summer virtual classes at: http://us12.campaign-archive2.com/?u=9b12daa3124e6a910a9170caa&id=e277b0c905

Special offer! – Register for three or more short courses and receive 20% off.

Do not forgot our early bird discount offer.  Register before 21 December 2016 to receive $50 off short courses and $100 off certifications. – http://us12.campaign-archive2.com/?u=9b12daa3124e6a910a9170caa&id=f5e4f82cdf