Spacious Potential in the Sharing Economy

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

By ASCM CEO Abe Eshkenazi, CSCP, CPA, CAE

The sharing economy is no longer just a catchy turn of phrase; today, sharing, renting and subscription services are everywhere. AirBnB for your holiday rental; WeWork for freelancers who prefer the office environment; Rover for the pup’s midday walk; Uber and Lyft when you need someone to drive you places; and Zipcar, LimeBike or Bird Scooters when you’d rather do the driving yourself. The potential applications are endless.

Although only 19 percent of U.S. adults have engaged in a sharing-economy transaction, PwC research reveals that 83 percent of survey respondents believe these services make life more convenient and efficient, 76 percent say they are better for the environment, and 43 percent admit that owning things can feel like a burden.

As ownership becomes unfashionable, the fashion industry is also taking notice.

“In October, the mall fixture [Express] launched Style Trial, a service that allows customers to borrow up to three pieces — with no limits on exchanges, free shipping both ways and free dry cleaning — for $69.95 per month,” writes Jasmin Malik Chua in Sourcing Journal. “If a subscriber loves something to death, she can buy it at a discount for keeps. Otherwise, she can keep garments circulating in an eternally refreshed ‘closet in the cloud’ with virtually infinite options yet zero commitments.”

Jim Hilt, Express executive vice president and chief customer experience officer, explains that this allows customers to tap the company’s “full assortment and styling services without breaking the budget.”

In addition to this kind of flexibility and cost savings, sharing clothes eliminates the hassle of shopping malls and the time spent packing bags for donation — not to mention all those minutes staring at our wardrobes trying to decide if an item still sparks joy.

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Shifting business models

Until very recently, most of us would never have considered staying in some random person’s home while on vacation, let alone sharing a sweater with a bunch of strangers. Yet today, Airbnb averages 425,000 guests per night — nearly 22 percent more than Hilton Worldwide.

“The data shows, renting and sharing are becoming increasingly popular alternatives,” the PwC report asserts. “Executives will be wise to assess the role of their product and brand in this model — are you squarely a purveyor of goods, or are you an enabler?”

For those supply chain managers bracing for change and facing some tough calls concerning clothing lifespans; quality control of shared garments; and logistics economics, especially for lower-cost items, there is some good news. The sharing economy is also flourishing in the education space, with LinkedIn Learning, Grow with Google, and a seemingly infinite number of instructive and informative videos on YouTube. Our own channel is bursting at the seams with customer success stories, webinars, research, annual conference sessions, and a multitude of supply chain education tailored to fit just right.

To join ASCM, joint membership is available through Australasian Supply Chain Institute for just $440 per annum. Visit our website for a full list of membership benefits.

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Indian regulations rain on Amazon and Walmart’s e-commerce parade

By ASCM CEO Abe Eshkenazi, CSCP, CPA, CAE

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Amazon and Walmart subsidiary Flipkart is scrambling to revamp its supply chains, vendor relationships and systems. New regulations from the world’s fastest growing economy have undermined these retailers’ business models and obstructed their sales in India’s burgeoning e-commerce sector.

Previously, foreign companies were forbidden from holding their own online inventory and shipping it directly to customers. Amazon had found a workaround in the form of local subsidiaries of firms in which it had holdings, which opponents insisted was violating the spirit of the rule. Largely due to such proxy sellers, Amazon and Walmart had controlled almost 80 percent of India’s e-commerce.

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But as of February 1, such goods are not permitted for sale by foreign companies. In addition, these firms are barred from entering into exclusive online sales agreements. A vendor’s inventory also will be considered under the control of an e-commerce marketplace if more than one-quarter of its sales are derived there.

The protectionist move follows ongoing complaints from domestic retailers over anticompetitive practices. Amazon and Walmart both requested a six-month postponement of the effective date but were denied.

“Thousands of products were pulled from Amazon.com Inc.’s India website Friday — the first direct impact from the country’s new e-commerce rules,” writes Corinne Abrams in the Wall Street Journal. The article goes on to explain that the restrictions are the latest effort by India to curb U.S. tech giants’ dominance in the country and “promote homegrown companies” as Prime Minister Narendra Modi seeks a second term.

“Both Amazon and Walmart have made big bets in India, where the e-commerce market is estimated to balloon to $72 billion in 2022,” Abrams adds. “Amazon has pledged to invest $5 billion to expand in [India], while Walmart’s takeover of India’s Flipkart for $16 billion was its biggest acquisition ever.”

Global supply chain know-how

The operations of these e-commerce giants have been thrown into disarray. As these companies, and others, navigate such severe regulatory pressure, success will hinge upon the effectiveness, responsiveness and flexibility of their supply chains.

ASCM provides the resources you need to plot your own course through the ever-shifting global marketplace. The APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) program enables individuals to master the fundamentals of supply chain strategy, business model design, relationship-building, risk management and much more. In particular, the CSCP learning system includes a module centered around monetary, regulatory and trade considerations; negotiation and collaboration; and international standards and compliance. Begin your journey toward this world-class certification today.

The Australasian Supply Chain Institute (ASCI) is the Premier Channel Partner for APICS and offers joint memberships with ASCI for local and ASCM for global membership for both corporates and individuals. Contact us today at http://www.asci.org.au/membership or enquiries@asci.org.au.

Nufarm site visit generates sharing

As part of the ASCI Site Visit Series, ASCI arranged for 14 ASCI Members to visit the Nufarm Raymond Rd manufacturing facility on Friday 25 January 2019.

Both nbn Co and Nufarm are ASCI Corporate Members, and within the ASCI Corporate Membership package, comes the benefit of sharing and learning within the network.

nbn at rr

Site Manager, George Fletcher gave the group an introduction to Nufarm and the site, see picture.

According to Angus Borland, Supply Chain Planning Manager – ANZ, Nufarm, the group enjoyed the balmy 44 degrees for a walk through a number of the production lines, followed by a planning discussion he led alongside two site planners (Michael Buttigieg-Raymond Rd and Matt Calabro-Pipe Rd).

“This was a good 2-way discussion between Nufarm and nbn Co,” Angus recalls.

Ryan Jones, Manager Integrated Demand Planning, nbn Co agrees. “The two organisations couldn’t be further apart in terms of industry. However, there were so many similarities both in forecasting and planning systems; S&OP processes; safety; and challenges such as demand accuracy and the management of inventory,” he said.

“In addition, we could really appreciate the weather challenges faced by the organisation and were impressed with Nufarm’s long term strategies and predictive analysis.”

There were some key areas identified where a visit to non Co could benefit the Nufarm demand planners. Hence, the sharing and learning process is in motion!

Look out for more events within the ASCI Site Visit Series, held all over the country in 2019!

 

Blockchain unlocked for supply chain

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Extract from Supply Chain Management Review

It can be hard for many people to understand what makes a blockchain different from a traditional database. So while the potential opportunities may be huge, the practical reality is that introducing a new technology like blockchain into a large, global organisation takes time, planning, and – most of all – the buy-in of decision-makers throughout the organisation.

ASCI loves free online learning tools for supply chain management!

Here, the U.S. Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) has developed a free, interactive tool to help supply chain management professionals learn about blockchain and its potential uses. AFIT recently published a live blockchain application that can be accessed from any computer or smart phone, along with a complementary series of tutorial videos that walk learners through a blockchain simulation.

Daniel Stanton, founder of SecureMarking and author of Supply Chain Management for Dummies takes us through AFIT Blockchain for Supply Chain Demonstrations. These include six short “How To” videos on blockchain. It includes links with real time dashboards to practice blockchain software as Daniel walks you through the scenario.

An interesting feature of this demonstration is that it tracks the entire lifecycle of a component – from its point of manufacture to its eventual decommissioning and disposal. This is important because many supply chains now face a challenge of having used products re-introduced and sold as new by unscrupulous businesses. These used products can lead to costly problems such as unexpected breakdowns of equipment. In some situations, tracking decommissioning could also be useful for ensuring that hazardous materials are properly disposed of, or that re-usable components are properly recycled.

VIDEO 1 – An introduction

VIDEO 2 – A military scenario

VIDEO 3 – Create Secmark tokens

VIDEO 4 – Transferring Assets

VIDEO 5 – Decommissioning

VIDEO 6 – Wrap Up

In the process of developing this scenario, the team faced some of the basic decisions that any company will need to address when designing a blockchain. For example:
• Will the blockchain be public, allowing anyone to join, or will it be private, meaning only pre-approved companies can participate in transactions?
• What activities will each company in the blockchain be allowed to perform?
• Will participation be compulsory or will there need to be an incentive structure?
• How much visibility will each company have into the overall supply chain?

Invest in your professional learning and commit some of your commute times to learning some of this exciting technology!

This blog is an extract from Supply Chain Management Review. See full article here.