Embracing digital disruption

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Digitalization is changing the game for every industry—and every industry knows it. In one report dealing with the financial industry, 100% of business leaders surveyed said that they expect their sectors to be impacted by digital disruption in the future.

While almost 90% of manufacturers said they’d consider implementing digitally disruptive technology, only 28% think it will generate increased revenue, and only 13% see digitization as a path to a new revenue model. Manufacturers—and industries in general—are worried about the risks of digitally disrupting their current processes and technologies, especially if they’re already profitable.

System-wide change would cause trepidation in any organization, but it’s necessary to address those fears to be able to transition into the new age of hyper-connectivity. Right now, industries and companies need to figure out how they will embrace new technology, put aside their doubts, and make digital disruption work for them—before it’s working for one of their competitors.

Hear Infor President Duncan Angove discuss digital disruption and bridging the gap between what an analog company can deliver and what today’s digital customer expects.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

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Digital supply chain transformation: real and viable or just tech hype?

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The words “digital transformation” may appear to your colleagues as just the next tech hype. After all, weren’t we all just talking about cloud?

But just like cloud, digital transformation is real and viable — and here to stay.

Sure, but what is digital transformation exactly? There are as many definitions as there are pundits and luminaries. Infor President Duncan Angove talks about it this way: Digital transformation is about closing the gap between what your DIGITAL customers expect and what your ANALOG organisation can actually deliver. The aim of digital transformation is to go beyond merely automating a process or reducing costs, and to differentiate a company in significant ways from its competitors.

“Software and technology is disrupting every industry we look at,” Angove says. Whether it’s Uber in transportation or Airbnb in hostelry, every industry is being disrupted by the application of technology.

“Infor is at an interesting intersection, because we are a software cloud technology company that understands industries. So companies are coming to us, asking how we can help them navigate this digital disruption and take advantage of it.”

Here are just a few examples:

DSW – developing a strategy for a fresh customer experience

Nordstrom – creating a converged commerce experience for customers

Travis Perkins – delivering a variety of strategic, technical, and financial benefits

Fuller’s – deploying cloud software as the basis of a radical business process transformation to drive growth

Echoing these customers, Infor recently hosted groups of executives from the US and Europe to discuss digital transformation. Representing manufacturing, financial services, consumer packaged goods (CPG), retail, and media and entertainment all said their organisations have digital initiatives under way.

Within digital, three common themes emerged: executive leadership is essential; employee skills have to keep pace; and the data deluge must be harnessed into actionable insights. Here is a summary of one of the events.

So, where should your company start? Get inspired here.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

Digital transformation that drives progress

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Henry Miller once said “Whatever there be of progress in life comes not through adaptation but through daring.” To a large extent, that holds true in the business world today.

Many companies struggle with processes that can’t keep up with the pace of change, outdated business models, and an inability to stay competitive in a rapidly evolving global market. While adapting to these types of changes may be enough to keep the lights on, rarely does it lead to differentiation. What these companies need is to transform their business in a disruptive way that drives progress. We believe that digital transformation can lead to the kind of progress that can make a difference for a business, its customers, its industry, and the world at large.

But what exactly is “digital transformation”? Chances are you’ve been hearing the phrase bandied about; but you may not know what exactly it means—or why you should care. CIO.com defines digital transformation as “the acceleration of business activities, processes, competencies, and models to fully leverage the changes and opportunities of digital technologies and their impact in a strategic and prioritised way.” But more than just acceleration, digital transformation is about the need for businesses to outpace digital disruption and stay competitive in a rapidly evolving business environment.

At its core, digital transformation is all about disruption. Whether that disruption is beneficial or devastating depends entirely upon where you find yourself on the wave—at the crest or at the bottom. To embrace digital transformation, you need to make it part of your corporate DNA. You need to start figuring out:

* How to uncover the pockets of innovation in your company—and turn them into opportunities for organisational and go-to-market transformation

* How you can put the structure in place to support digital transformation—and make it sustainable

* How to create a clear digital vision with a strategy for digital transformation

* How to harness data science to drive transformation

* How to position your employees and your organisation to successfully execute a digital transformation strategy

Find help here on how to get started on your own digital transformation.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

Digital supply chain transformation and customer-centricity

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Turning a digital business strategy into a reality remains elusive for many organizations. Even businesses that are forward thinking and have already begun developing a digital transformation strategy will find new gaps to fill and new challenges to address that didn’t exist last year in the areas of new regulations, new trade policies, and new customer demands, to name a few.

As a result, many businesses are recognizing that digitization is not only about improving business processes or automation. Digital transformation is about redefining business. It’s about wrapping services around products, or going a step further, replacing products with services.

Cloud technology is a catalyst to new business models, with data, digitization, and networks serving as the underlying core. When this is applied to a supply chain — where hundreds of people and parties impact the order, production, and delivery of goods — it spawns new ways for businesses to service customers.

Supply chains are rife with inefficiency, bottlenecks, and information silos. They tend to be set up as long, winding linear trails of business transactions. Data and visibility remain bottled up in each trading partner organization. This fragmented landscape has become inadequate in today’s world of always-on commerce and ultra-demanding customers. On the surface, there is low-hanging fruit in digitization of processes such as order management or supplier collaboration. But digital transformation possibilities run much deeper, into the foundational infrastructure of business-to-business commerce, where a network approach to business can deliver massive returns by finding new ways to deliver value to customers.

Transforming entire industry supply chains

Digital transformation is a broad term being probed and defined in multiple ways. In some industries, such as automotive, the movement is not so subtle — and more of a change locomotive. Disruptive factors such as connected cars and autonomous vehicles are reshaping the industry. The transformational vision for automotive companies is a new ecosystem of suppliers, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), dealers, and complementary services that enable new customer experiences and products to be delivered.

The industry is well on its way. Major players like Ford are investing heavily in technology. Ford just raised $2.8 billion to drive new innovation. The company has already committed to spending $4.5 billion to bolster a lineup of electric cars, with plans to release a fully autonomous car in 2021. The ability to integrate new innovations, technologies, and suppliers into the automotive ecosystem will be key to excelling in the future.

In retail, digital disruption is being spurred by immense pressure from consumers. And similar to auto, where outsiders like Uber and Tesla bring disruption, retail has been upended by the Amazons and Alibabas of the world. Consumers are accustomed to Walmart-like low costs and Amazonian convenience and delivery. As a result, retailers across all segments are being forced to be hyper-sensitive to consumers’ needs and wants. But competing with Amazon on delivery services while offering competitive pricing comes at a cost — to profitability.

Retailers recognize the need to transform how they order, produce, and deliver goods to be customer centric in new ways, while remaining profitable. New experiences and services are essential. Consider how retail is already evolving and leading to supply chain transformation. Some of the growing trends in shopping today include social shopping, pop-up stores, mobile commerce combined with trucks and vans, click-and-collect, personal shoppers, subscription-based shopping …

In-store, retailers are innovating as well. Ralph Lauren has introduced interactive touch-screen mirrors in its fitting rooms. IKEA has deployed virtual reality to allow shoppers to envision new rooms in their home. West Elm, a furniture provider owned by Williams Sonoma, has announced plans to open five hotels, which will act as showrooms where consumers can purchase goods.

Under pressure from nontraditional competitors and demanding consumers, the future supply chain relies on a network of manufacturers, suppliers, and service providers built around the customer to deliver new experiences, services and value.

2017 will sharpen focus on customer-centric commerce

The bounds of traditional business are being stretched. In 2017, we’ll see technology trends that go deeper into the reshaping of business models and further redefine industries.

Automotive companies are evolving into transportation service providers. Competition from non-traditional players raises the bar on technology and connectivity, forcing automakers to find new suppliers and partners that can deliver tech savvy innovation.

Retailers are evolving to deliver new forms of experience to the consumer. Competition from beyond the traditional industry is forcing retailers to get closer to customers through fast or free shipping, free and simple return programs, customized goods, and seamless order fulfillment from any shopping channel.

Consumer product brands like Tide are getting into homes with their detergent pods; consumers push a button from their laundry room to place an order. This bypasses the retailer and goes direct to the consumer.

In 2017, questions such as “What defines a true automotive company?” or “What defines a true retailer or consumer product company?” will have to be examined and redefined.

At the centre, of course, is the customer. Customers expect and demand more. Delivering on these expectations and fulfilling orders requires manufacturers and retailers to rewire the way they produce and deliver goods to their customers.

2017 looks to be a year of uncertainty and change. Social, technological, environmental, and political disruption will have massive impacts on commerce and supply chains. For businesses operating in nearly any industry, this means more pitfalls and challenges, accompanied by more pressing demands from customers. Companies and trading partners that fail to adapt are at risk.

Supply chains of the near future will have to operate as customer-centric networks. This should be the end state, or vision. Getting there requires a long road, starting with digital transformation.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.