Does Your Company Have the ‘Right Stuff’ to Embrace Advanced Analytics?

By: Henry Canitz – Director Product Marketing & Business DevelopmentPicture1

John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth on Mercury-Atlas 6 on February 20, 1962, just a few days after I was born. I grew up watching the Apollo Space Program launches including the six launches that sent humans to the moon and back. Like many kids back then I dreamed of being a test pilot and an Astronaut. I partially achieved that dream by becoming an Aerospace Test Engineer and working at Edwards Air Force Base where many of the early test flights by Chuck Yeager, Scott Crossfield, and other’s took place. On February 6, 2018, 56 years after John Glenn’s historic launch, SpaceX launched their Falcon Heavy rocket with Elon Musk’s Tesla Roadster and a dummy named Starman on a journey into the solar system. The Falcon Heavy is a new class of rockets that may allow man to colonize Mars and beyond. Today, space launches are routine with launches happening on a monthly if not weekly basis. Exciting stuff for someone who dreamed of being an astronaut.

It is also an exciting time to be a Supply Chain Practitioner. Like space exploration, the supply chain has become significantly more complicated over the last 25 years. Technological advances have simplified and automated a lot of routine processes while opening up entirely new opportunities. These new frontiers require advanced capabilities to drive business value such as cost reduction and customer service improvements. Analytics, for example, today is a routine part of a supply chain professional’s job. We can now analyze the end-to-end supply chain and quickly determine the best path forward. While speaking with practitioners at industry events it is quite apparent, some supply chain teams have the ‘Right Stuff’ to fully embrace advanced analytics while others are just beginning their journey.

Moving up the analytics maturity curve takes a combination of the right talent, processes and enabling technology. Unfortunately, the people component is often not adequately addressed. As supply chain planning incorporates more data, supply chain roles need to be redefined to support analysis and decision making. Just as Chuck Yeager had to acquire new abilities and skills to break the sound barrier, companies have to define new skills and roles to meet their envisioned advanced analytic enabled processes.

Below are a few of the new analytic roles for leading supply chain teams today:

  • Business Analyst: understands business needs, assesses the business impact of changes, captures, analyses and documents requirements and communicates requirements to relevant stakeholders.
  • Supply Chain Analyst: responsible for improving the performance of an operation by figuring out what is needed and coordinating with other employees to implement and test new supply chain methods.
  • Artificial Intelligence Specialist: work on systems that not only gather information but formulate decisions and act on that information. Software that determines Sentiment from Social Data is one example of the work of Artificial Intelligence Specialists.
  • Data Scientists / Big Data Analyst: analyzes and interprets complex digital data, such as the usage statistics of a website, especially in order to assist a business in its decision-making.
  • Database Engineer: responsible for building and maintaining the software infrastructure that enables computation over large data sets.

As our enterprise systems continue to produce volumes of data, we need to make smart decisions faster to drive the business forward. Does your current team have the ‘Right Stuff’ to embrace advanced analytics? What new roles do you need in your supply chain team? How should your team be organized to efficiently run the business while also driving innovation? Are your current supply chain systems sufficient to leverage new data sources and enable advanced analytics? Can you automate routine activities? These are just a few of the questions you should ask as you embrace all that analytics has to offer to keep your supply chain team engaged in value-creating activities.

Related Content:

About the Author:

Hank Canitz Picture

Henry Canitz is The Product Marketing & Business DevelopmentDirector at Logility. To read more of Henry’s insights visit www.logility.com/blog.

Advertisements

Is Your Supply Chain Planning System in the Cloud?

Supply Chain in the Cloud - 310 x 175My job requires a fair bit of air travel so I literally spend a good deal of my time with my head in the clouds. At 6’5” most airline seats are less than comfortable and provide very little leg, arm and shoulder room, so I often find the most practical activity during a flight is critical thinking. Yes, I might look like I am taking a nap but really I am deeply contemplating things like the current state of deploying Supply Chain Planning Technology in the cloud.

With the explosive growth in supply chain complexity and data volumes, a growing number of manufacturers, retailers and distributors of all sizes are all looking for more agile, easily implemented paths to better supply chain performance. Some have found it possible to enact powerful supply chain optimisations almost immediately, while saving substantial amounts of working capital and ensuring timely support for growth and collaboration over the long term.

They have chosen to deploy supply chain planning solutions in the Cloud.

Cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort.

Today, the range of implementation options for supply chain planning solutions stretches far beyond traditional on-premises hardware and software. Some competitive-minded organizations question the advisability of lengthy and complex infrastructure projects. These supply chain teams harness the full potential of the internet by taking advantage of deployment models with names like Software as a Service (SaaS), Platform as a Service (PaaS), Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS), and managed services.

Cloud-based deployment alternatives remove IT obstacles and accelerate the launching of supply chain initiatives. However, are the advantages of cloud deployments for supply chain solutions real and worthwhile? I think so, and I have provided a few of the biggest benefit areas for having your supply chain planning software in the cloud.

Benefit #1: Affordability and Savings

  • Lower upfront costs – Initial capital equipment expenses are reduced and total cost of ownership shifts to a highly predictable annual expense line item.
  • Optimal licensing, hosting and services options – The wide variety of options provide a solution delivery profile that fits just about any organisation’s software procurement model and budget process.
  • Ability to reallocate valuable IT resources – Cloud-based deployments free up enterprise IT resources to focus on strategic initiatives and meet mission-critical demands rather than installing software updates and performing system administration.
  • Scalability to handle supply chain growth – It’s a significant competitive advantage to be able to activate capabilities as requirements grow and flex over time.

Benefit #2: Tangible Business Benefits

  • Accelerated ROI – Cloud deployments often deliver better cash flow and create a positive bottom-line impact much quicker than traditional models.
  • Greater agility to react to change – Because “the infrastructure is on the internet,” there is no hardware to implement and no software to install. Users can access the system from any location through web-connected laptops, tablets and smart phones.

Benefit #3: Reliability and Security

  • Less risk of unscheduled downtime – Resiliency and high availability are characteristics of a well-designed cloud-based deployment.
  • Robust security – The fear that storing business data on a cloud server could make it vulnerable to unauthorised access has been assuaged by the great security track record of hosting providers in securing and ensuring data privacy.
  • Expert administrative services – No one knows the ins and outs of system administration better than the solution provider organisation itself. The provider’s technical personnel are an essential resource for installing software updates, hot fixes, service packs and version updates in an optimum computer environment.

According to Gartner, cloud computing has reached a sufficient level of maturity to be in its “productive phase.” In fact, cloud-based solutions have proven enormously successful in a broad range of commercial applications, revolutionising the affordability and “adoptability” of solutions for a much wider range of companies. It is time for Supply Chain Planning solutions to join in this success?

As you consider the benefits of a cloud-based supply chain planning solution, conduct a self-evaluation by asking these questions:

  1. Does your current supply chain planning technology infrastructure fall short of the task of providing the supply chain planning capabilities you need?
  2. Is it difficult in your organisation to drive new capital investments for updated equipment and systems?
  3. Is your IT staff overwhelmed with user support issues and other system administration tasks?

If the answer to any of these questions is “yes,” then it’s time to find out how a cloud-based solution can accelerate one of the most rewarding business improvement initiatives your organisation can undertake: Optimising your Supply Chain.

Related Content:

 

About the author

Hank Canitz PictureHenry Canitz is The Product Marketing & Business Development Director at Logility. To read more of Henry’s insights visit www.logility.com/blog.

Removing the Two Barriers to Optimising Inventory

Removing the Two Barriers to Optimizing Inventory

Removing the Two Barriers to Optimising Inventory
Caught Between a Rock and a Hard Place

Henry Canitz – Product Marketing & Business Development Director, Logility

Supply chain leaders often find themselves in a difficult situation when it comes to the conflicting goals of improving customer service and minimising inventory. The omni-channel world we live in has driven customer service to new heights. Companies that don’t prioritise providing what the customer wants when they want it will soon find themselves losing market-share. On the other hand, product lifecycles continue to accelerate and the penalty for carrying too much of the wrong items leads to high levels of obsolescence. This isn’t a new dilemma, the balancing act between inventory and service has been going on since the earliest days of commerce. However, the penalties for bad service and/or high inventory are growing more severe and the space “between a rock and a hard place” is continuing to shrink.

Because of variability in demand and supply, increasing customer service levels can lead to higher levels of safety stock. Improving cash flow by indiscriminately reducing working capital dollars can result in slashing the wrong inventory, resulting in lower customer service levels.

While some supply chain teams have conducted inventory optimisation (IO) initiatives to raise service levels while lowering inventory cost, others worry that they won’t be successful in the effort.

There are two common barriers that can prevent an organisation from reaping the benefits of inventory optimisation efforts:

  • IO success can be undermined by reliance on:
    • Limited tools (such as modules built into, or bolted onto, existing ERP systems)
    • Inadequate solutions (e.g. error-prone, hard-to maintain spreadsheets)
    • Black-box systems (where calculations are difficult or impossible to validate)
  • An internal perception that understanding and implementing proven mathematical tools and business processes in order to streamline the creation of optimal inventory policies and targets is too difficult for the team to take on.

Overcoming these barriers is easier than you think and the benefits are too good to ignore. Companies that embrace Multi-echelon Inventory Optimisation (MEIO) achieve, on average, a 28% increase in inventory turns.

A simple three-step approach can remove barriers to achieving a successful MEIO initiative.

  1. Understand your current state and lay the foundation for a solid business case. Assess your organisation’s capabilities from the perspectives of:
    • Inventory performance
    • Business process and inventory management expertise
    • Technology and organisational readiness.
  2. Create a future state inventory optimisation capability—process, technology, organisation—that provides your supply chain team with a roadmap to success.
  3. Continue to drive fundamental strategic changes that create greater resiliency and agility throughout the supply chain and establish a cycle of continuous improvement.

Can you overcome the two common barriers to implementing inventory optimisation capabilities and get out of being Between a Rock and a Hard Place? Of course. We work with companies around the world who are driving significant value from their MEIO process.

Learn More:

 

About the author

Hank Canitz Picture

Henry Canitz is The Product Marketing & Business Development Director at Logility. To read more of Henry’s insights visit www.logility.com/blog.

ASCI2018 Save the Date

Here at ASCI, it has been a pipeline dream of mine to run our own conference for the many members of ours in the community.  I am fortunate enough to announce, that this has become a reality and our very own conference ‘ASCI2018‘ is underway to be brought to you on 23 & 24 May 2018.

We have been working and will continue to be working hard in the lead up to ASCI2018. I am aware of the rapidly changing environment of the supply chain industry and the ASCI team have implemented this into the theme and program of the conference. ASCI2018, will allow for supply chain managers to receive some clarity around the latest industry developments admit a rapidly changing supply chain landscape due to e-Commerce disruptions.  This is why we have named the conference ASCI2018: e-Commerece: Driving Supply Chains into the Future.

Businessman Smiling During Meeting

The world is experiencing major disruptions. CEOs see more threats today versus three years ago, up 78% according to a recent study.* As e-Commerce turns the spotlight onto the supply chain, Operations, Logistics and Supply practitioners have a huge responsibility to offset these threats, leverage new technologies and build faster, better global supply chains. More than ever, these practitioners need to be at the top of their game, working together across functions within the organisation, and building the capability to respond to e-Commerce. Equally important is that this theme is addressed in relation to the technical best practice knowledge on which ASCI has laid its foundations.

Attending ASCI2018 will be a unique opportunity to engage your organisation’s entire supply chain, logistics and procurement teams in a professional learning experience. At ASCI, we’re passionate about helping members re-position themselves for sustainability in light of major disruptions. These major disruptions are coming thick and fast. We need to protect and educate our members so they can respond to such change.

Finally, I have to mention that we have selected our strategic endorsement partner, Akolade to help run our conference. We are very impressed with the quality and relevance of Akolade’s leading-edge, well researched events which we have been participating as the Endorsement Partner. Akolade has demonstrated the expertise and professional approach we require to run ASCI2018 and we look forward to collaborating yet again on our very own conference.

I am so proud of this achievement and milestone the ASCI team have accomplished. Looking back at all the hard work the team have done to make this conference happen shows how dedicated they are to bring the best of the best to our member base. I look forward to seeing you all at our conference.

pieter_fred_2

 

*PwC CEO Insights, 2017: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/ceo-agenda/ceosurvey/2017/au/key-findings.html

 

Pieter Nagel
CEO
Australasian Supply Chain Institute (ASCI)

Embracing digital disruption

tech image

Digitalization is changing the game for every industry—and every industry knows it. In one report dealing with the financial industry, 100% of business leaders surveyed said that they expect their sectors to be impacted by digital disruption in the future.

While almost 90% of manufacturers said they’d consider implementing digitally disruptive technology, only 28% think it will generate increased revenue, and only 13% see digitization as a path to a new revenue model. Manufacturers—and industries in general—are worried about the risks of digitally disrupting their current processes and technologies, especially if they’re already profitable.

System-wide change would cause trepidation in any organization, but it’s necessary to address those fears to be able to transition into the new age of hyper-connectivity. Right now, industries and companies need to figure out how they will embrace new technology, put aside their doubts, and make digital disruption work for them—before it’s working for one of their competitors.

Hear Infor President Duncan Angove discuss digital disruption and bridging the gap between what an analog company can deliver and what today’s digital customer expects.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

ERP Trends – Democracy in the Cloud

digital-student

 

The next great wave of technology is upon us, a global tsunami, heralding change in every facet of our lives. For manufacturers, the decade ahead will be transformative. As ERP deploys the power of Big Data and Predictive Analytics, harnesses the flow of information from the Internet of Things, incorporates Machine Learning, and immerses workers in an  increasingly intuitive UX, businesses will find themselves in possession of almost unimaginable agility, flexibility and control. Continue reading

Tomorrow’s Supply Chains

shaun_tomorrows_supply_chainsIt’s an exciting time to work in the field of supply chain. There’s a sense of change in the air – an awareness of the future unfolding. There are thought leaders who think we’re headed for a ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’, an era of sustainable, socially conscious enterprises, underpinned by the intelligent interconnection of software and machines. For decision makers along the supply chain, it’s time for research – and for vision.  In many instances, the adoption (or non-adoption) of today’s technologies will determine who thrives and who dies along the supply chains of tomorrow.

Let’s take a look at some of these converging technologies, and consider their application along the supply chain.

The Cloud

For small- to medium-sized businesses, access to the new competitive toolkit is taking place on the Cloud. Even beyond price considerations (which are significant) unlocking the power of nascent technologies makes the adoption of Cloud services a logical step in the evolution of most organizations. There are still good reasons to choose on premise or hybrid solutions, but extending the reach of an ERP to include data external to the company (such as weather, demographics, machine and sensor data), makes better sense on the Cloud.

There are more advantages to the Cloud than are dreamt of in anyone’s philosophy, but to my mind, the Cloud’s ability to facilitate highly collaborative ecosystems is exceptionally powerful. Both responsiveness and efficiency are enhanced by the flow of real-time data, which can help to minimize operational misalignment at the interface of supply chain stages.

Big Data and Advanced Analytics

By 2021 there will be more than 35 zettabytes of online data. For those who haven’t a clue what a zettabyte is (myself included) that’s 35,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes of information. That’s an impressive amount of data, and most of it is unstructured, meaning that before the advent of Big Data it was largely inaccessible to computers. These days, with Big Data analytics programs, all that unstructured data can be collected, organized, and analyzed. This facilitates unprecedented accuracy and clarity of data, opening the door to better planning and decision-making.

Artificial Intelligence (AI)

When I think of AI, my mind wanders to Star Trek’s Data, rapidly processing technical information from the Enterprise’s computer, and instantly recommending a course of action. While we’re not quite ready to staff our distribution centres with androids, the capabilities of Artificial Intelligence will have enormous benefits along the supply chain. AI-driven ‘chatbots’ are already improving the User Experience for customers of shipping companies, making it  easier to find store locations, determine shipping rates and track packages.

AI can draw insight from enormous data sets. That promises more accurate forecasting and lower market mediation costs (fewer stock-outs and mark-downs) – a major profit eater for innovative product manufacturers. Unprecedented control over data will allow for fine tuning, helping to tighten up end-to-end visibility, time-to-market, and overall agility. AI can also serve as a bridge between supply chains, facilitating a seamless flow of transactions. Of course, the most visible manifestation of AI, along with chatbots, will be fleets of autonomous delivery vehicles.

Robots & Cobots

Industrial robots are nothing new, but their presence along the supply chain is growing. When material handling is better handed off to a machine, especially in dangerous situations, or when precision is required, benefits in efficiency, responsiveness and safety naturally accrue.

What I find particularly interesting is the movement towards ‘cobots’, smaller, less expensive, more flexible robots that work side-by-side with humans. Cobots are becoming popular for pick and place, palletizing, and packaging. They will doubtless lead to significant reductions in turnaround times, and create increasingly responsive supply chains.

The Internet of Things (IoT)

The Internet of Things, sometimes referred to as the driver of Industry 4.0, ties together people, processes, data, and things, via a burgeoning universe of devices and sensors. Unlike older, ‘passive’ generations of sensors, IoT sensors are active. A connected pallet for example, can relay information on its whereabouts and condition. A connected machine can allow remote technicians to run diagnostics and initiate repair options, resulting in increased uptime and improved customer service. Importing data from IoT devices to an analytics platform will allow, for example, unprecedented stock control and precise inventory monitoring.

When it comes to transportation, IoT systems are already in use, optimizing fleet efficiencies through route planning, directing drivers to avoid traffic jams, maintaining temperatures for perishable goods,  and helping carriers reduce ‘deadheads’ (the time trucks run without cargo). In addition, IoT technologies such as RFID provide the ability to track products throughout the global supply chain.

Some of the most powerful uses of the IoT are in the area of customer behavior. In-store sensors can track traffic and shopping patterns to yield clear insights into consumer behaviour, improving brand engagement and increasing sales. This depth of intelligence into supply and demand will benefit everyone along the supply chain.

There are, of course, more technologies to talk about than can fit in a single blog. In my next offering, aimed to coincide with the release of SYSPRO Harmony, I’ll talk about Social Media, and the exciting new possibilities that are opening up for problem solving and collaboration along the supply chain.

About our Guest Blogger
Shaun Butler

shaun_butler_blog_image

Shaun Butler is the Regional CEO of SYSPRO Asia Pacific, having joined SYSPRO in 2003. Whilst Shaun is based in Singapore he spends a reasonable amount of time travelling throughout the rest of the region

Having spent more than 20 years in and around various ERP companies Shaun has found it refreshing to work in the SYSPRO environment, with long term employees who are committed and passionate about a single product.

Shaun’s role is broad and varied but in short he is responsible for the growth and strategic direction of SYSPRO across Asia and the Pacific. He is extremely proud of the company and the team SYSPRO has built, supported by the many customers who place their trust in SYSPRO’s solution and capability.

 

5 Benefits to learning via Virtual Classrooms

The future of education is content delivered via virtual classrooms, especially in Australia where the tyranny of distance and increased traffic congestion hinder the opportunities to learn in residential classrooms.  These virtual classrooms are held online where participates can communicate, view presentations and interact with facilitators and peers.  To sum it all up, virtual classrooms are very similar to traditional classrooms, where the teaching is still the same but it is delivered in a convenient format.

So, how can individuals benefit from these virtual classrooms?

  1. It is flexible, you can stay at your work desk and log on for a few hours.  You can participate in the lesson via a laptop, PC or tablet/iPad.  With just a few hours duration needed at a time for a virtual class, students do not have to take out a whole day for learning.  This benefits employers as well, as they avoid roster shuffling and extra staffing.
  2. Chat boxes and polls will be available during the class to allow students to interact as they would in a residential classroom.  Polls allow for facilitators to gauge the knowledge and understanding of the class.
  3. Similar to a traditional classroom, the facilitator is in control of the style of content delivery.  They are able to mute and un-mute students.  The facilitators can chose when question time is or when students can be interactive.  This gives the feel of the familiarity of a traditional classroom where the facilitator runs how the content is delivered.   As well as, gives the opportunity for students to share their stories.
  4. It allows participants to learn and be able to immediately applying what they learn to their job, while it is fresh on their mind.
  5. No cancellations – there are no limitations to numbers.

We hope these 5 benefits of virtual classrooms have given you a better understanding of the concept.

apicsAU has designed a series of Summer Virtual Classrooms which have been developed from the Best of the Best short course offerings from 2016.   View our summer virtual classes at: http://us12.campaign-archive2.com/?u=9b12daa3124e6a910a9170caa&id=e277b0c905

Special offer! – Register for three or more short courses and receive 20% off.

Do not forgot our early bird discount offer.  Register before 21 December 2016 to receive $50 off short courses and $100 off certifications. – http://us12.campaign-archive2.com/?u=9b12daa3124e6a910a9170caa&id=f5e4f82cdf

Is your business disruption ready?

blog-image

A technological storm is brewing, one that has many different names. The Fourth Industrial Revolution. The Cyber Physical Supply Chain. Industry 4.0. The Age of Disruption. The Digital Age.

Whatever name you prefer, the concept behind them all is the same; we are facing a wave of change driven by innovations in robotics, autonomous vehicles, additive manufacturing, smart machines, e-commerce, big data, artificial intelligence, machine learning and cognitive computing. Machines are becoming smarter. Jobs are becoming automated. Management is becoming outdated.

It is poised to affect the entire end-to-end supply chain. It’s impacting every area from digging stuff out of the ground, through to the factory, the warehouse and now the transportation of goods. Your children are unlikely to do the same job you did. In fact, the entire concept of a job for life, even just a career, is something that may soon be a relic of the past.

It’s a winner take all model. For those winners, the spoils will be enormous, concentrating great power into the hands of a small group of technology driven organisations. Unlike the First Industrial Revolution, which benefited people both as participants in the production and consumption of goods, this time round the greatest beneficiaries will be those with capital; the shareholders. The benefits to ordinary people will be limited to that of a consumer.

To demonstrate how big this shift is, according to a 2014 estimate, the three leading companies of Silicon Valley had a combined market capitalisation of $1.09 trillion and employed 137,000. Just twenty-five years earlier, in 1990, the three largest companies in Detroit had a market capitalisation of $36 billion – but they also collectively employed about 1.2 million workers. The trickle down model seems to have stopped trickling.

So while the World Wide Web provides many things for free, such as knowledge, many workers are seeing their traditional skills become redundant by new computer technologies and the new employment opportunities have mainly been created for highly skilled workers. The scary point is, we are only at the very start of this economic and social transformation. By 2025 autonomous vehicles –cars, lorries, drones – will be commonplace, replacing the multitude of driving jobs currently carried out by people. In the US alone there are 8.7 million trucking-related jobs, and approximately 1 million car drivers (180,000 taxi drivers, 160,000 Uber drivers, 500,000 school bus drivers, and 160,000 transit bus drivers). Very few of these will have a job moving forwards.

The transformation will affect more than blue collar workers; the nature of occupations and whole industries is changing. Technology is enabling not just the automation of repetitive tasks but also cognitive tasks involving subtle and non-routine judgment. All the signs indicate that we are entering a period of disruptive change of a scale not seen since we decided to put down our pitchforks, stop living an agricultural existence and head for the cities to become part of an industrial society.

Companies like Amazon, who have a clear vision as to how these technologies can aid their mission to dominate the world of retail, are mercilessly pushing their virtuous cycle of innovation, changing the way we buy goods, and our expectations around when and how they are delivered. They envision an end-to-end value chain dominated by platforms that they are in control of, a model where the consumer only has to say out loud what they want, and behind the scenes a fully automated global supply kicks into gear to provide your goods within hours.

The days of mass production are now over. The future supply chain will be personal, automated and local. The question is – are you ready?

To find out the answer to this, and to learn more about the nature of this new wave of creative destruction, be sure to attend my full day workshop on Disruption in the Supply Chain.

During the day we will explore the nature of the changes currently underway, how they will affect your business, what companies like Amazon are doing with these technologies to ensure they orchestrate the whole international supply chain, and how companies need to change their mindsets and organisational structures in order to adapt to this new world.

Learn how to not just survive, but thrive during this time of disruption.

About our Guest Blogger

Sean Culey

Member of the European Leadership Team of the APICS Supply Chain Council SCOR-P, FCILT, is a recognised strategic advisor, business transformation expert, keynote speaker and author focusing on helping companies develop compelling value propositions and strategies that get executed. Previously CEO of SEVEN, Sean has 25 years of global experience across numerous verticals, and is also CMO for an international software company. Sean will be delivering a series of workshops on the impact of disruptive innovations on business across the Asia Pacific region in November 2016, and his first book; Transition Point: Revolution, Evolution or Endgame? is due in 2017.

http://www.supplychaindisruption.com

Do you have a supply chain story to tell?

blogface-think-about-it-1554892

We know that it’s not in your DNA to seek the limelight. However, supply chain management is rising in popularity as leading companies lean on supply chain attributes to position, promote and differentiate products, services and brands.

According to a recent article from APICS, “The CMO and the supply chain,” supply chain performance is a big deal, a big differentiator, and a game changer that can dictate the difference between generations of locked-in loyal customers and lost customers for life.

The article says that to the visionary CMO, the supply chain doesn’t run in the background. The supply chain is part of the story. It is part of the customer experience and an ingredient in the brand promise. It’s become a visible component in the marketing mix.

So, what does this mean for you? All of a sudden, you have the opportunity to tell a story. To make a difference. Now’s your chance!

Whilst this may sound a little daunting, there are ways and means to slowly build your confidence in public speaking and commence telling your story.  As a member of the professional supply chain community, apicsAU welcomes your story via its regular podcast channel, blog, symposiums, networking events and member profile opportunities.

Or, for those well versed in story telling, there’s apicsAU’s major conference – SMART.

Right on top of the issues facing supply chain professionals in Australia, the SMART 2017 conference theme will radically re-position delegates’ sentiment regarding the future of the supply chain industry in Australia.

The conference, to be held in the brand new International Convention Centre in Sydney on 29/30 March 2017, will provide a conference program “from the industry, for the industry.” We’re now calling for papers.

Five tips to securing a speaker slot at SMART

1. Review the SMART Conference theme and streams The theme for SMART 2017 – Innovation, productivity & performance in an age of disruption – is a narrative we’re hearing amongst leading industry thought leaders. Research the topic online and review how your organisation adds value to the theme. What is your story? How does it make a difference in the current market? What can others learn from you?

For the first time in the history of SMART, the streams represent the complete scope of the supply chain domain:

1. Manufacturing & Operations

2. Transport & Logistics

3. Supply Chain Strategy

4. Procurement & Purchasing

5. Systems and Technology

Continuous improvement and Lean will be consistent topics throughout these streams.

2. Review past Conference programs to see the calibre of speakers You will notice that the titles of speakers are generally middle management level or above. There are a mixture of local and international speakers. Do not limit yourself to just one speaker submission! Think about a number of angles to your story and what’s already been covered. Past Conference programs are available on request.

3. Update your biography and include keywords from the conference theme You will need to spend some time updating your biography to include latest achievements. Add keywords in relation to the conference theme. List any papers or presentations you’ve presented recently including any feedback received from audiences.

4. Update your online presence LinkedIn, Twitter and blog posts will be key reference checks conducted by the SMART conference organiser. Ensure your speaker’s online social footprint reflects the biography you submit.

5. Get in early! Lastly, get in early with your submission to ensure that you gain the best possible opportunity to secured a spot for SMART 2017. Download the Speaker submission form or email us today to get involved in telling your story to our community.

Note, a speaker spot is at the discretion of the SMART Conference Program Director.