ASCI2018 Advisory Panel

Our journey continues on the path to ASCI2018. Our main announcement has been made and the implementation is well under way. Our next step is to announce our advisory panel, and here it is.

·       Pieter Nagel, CEO, ASCI – Dr Nagel has spent his whole working career of more than 30-years, in the Supply Chain domain. He has achieved a dynamic balance between corporate, consulting and academic positions and has always endeavoured to advance the logistics profession. He developed an international reputation as a leader in Supply Chain Strategy.

·       Penny Bell, ASCI Director and Supply Chain Director, Medical Devices, ANZ, Johnson and Johnson – Penny Bell is a highly effective strategic supply chain executive, with well-developed general management competencies who focuses organisations on their strategic direction, challenges the status quo through continuous improvement initiatives, guides transformational change programs and identifies and develops high performing talent.

·       Henry Brunekreef, ASCI Director and Director Advisory Services, Supply Chain and Operations Management, KPMG – Henry Brunekreef is a Senior Manager with nearly 20 years of industry and consultancy expertise in leading organisations to operations excellence, with extensive domestic and international experience in all aspects of Supply Chain, Customer Service, Logistics and Project / Change Management. First-class strategic thinking, networking and interpersonal skills allow him to create high performing teams and drive necessary change. Henry is result driven whilst constantly focusing on customer requirements.

·      Laynie Kelly, ASCI Director and Marketing Manager ASIA Pacific, IPTOR – Laynie is an accomplished marketing and communications executive and advisor with more than 20 years corporate development experience in the technology, food & beverage, automotive and media sectors, managing sales and creative project teams. Laynie specialises in applying her expertise and market knowledge to consistently exceed the marketing performance of her clients.

Our advisory panel will be able to provide the strategic advice and relevant industry knowledge to take ASCI2018 to the next level. The panel includes an array of experienced professionals from across the supply chain, as you can see above.

With such a strong advisory panel, ASCI2018 is sure to be a unique opportunity. Each panellist comes from varying sectors within the industry, meaning your organisation will be able to engage everyone, from logistics to procurement and overall, your entire organisation can benefit from the latest industry advances.

You are also invited to take part in our survey and let us know what you want to see and hear at the conference – HERE

 

Regards,

Pieter Nagel
CEO
Australasian Supply Chain Institute

RAAF Site Visit

Green Light Day 2017

Our August site visit was one of the most interesting and insightful we have had to date. This is ASCI’s first step as we change the format of our site visits and ramp up the learning experience to new heights and what better way to start this take off than with the RAAF Base Richmond.

The day started off with ASCI staff and members meeting up on a crisp Richmond morning at 8:30, where we were lead into the base and given our safety briefing. The first session provided an outline of the Australian Defence Organisation’s supply chain, including the role of Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group (CASG) in supporting the C130J and C27J aircraft based at RAAF Richmond.

Now we come to the exciting part, we got to go inside the C27J Spartan , a battlefield airlift transport aircraft operated by Number 35 Squadron. This particular aircraft is able to move people, equipment and supplies in Australia and the surrounding area. Inside, we got to see how everything is packed in and all the different facilities they have to get their goods from point A to point B. The aircraft is able to take a wide variety of tasks including being able to support humanitarian missions in remote areas, delivering ammunition to front line troops and also undertake aero-medical evacuation of casualties. This aircraft is able to carry a significant amount of weight and land on airstrips that are not suited to some of their other aircraft, providing additional capability especially on humanitarian disaster relief missions.

Some of the C27J’s missions include air drops, this means they cannot land due to the damage or limited capacity of an airstrip however supplies are still able to be delivered.  Our next stop was 176 Air Dispatch Squadron, where the parachutes used for the air drops are cleaned, repairs, packed and stored.  These parachutes go through a whole production line to make sure they are suitable for both trained personnel and supplies which can include supplies as large as tractors.

Our day ended with a chat about the storage of inventory in the Australian Defence Force including the use of a national network of warehouses and storage sites. This allowed for question time, where members were able to better understand concepts used at the RAAF Base Richmond and take these notes back to their own daily job.

The whole experience was interesting and shows the steps ASCI is taking to make these experiences more exciting and intriguing for members to benefit.  One member stated, it was a “great lifetime experience… thanks for organising it.” We are eager to see what our next site visit will entail!

Food & Beverage: Five Ways SYSPRO can Alleviate Your Headaches

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(Part 1)

Last weekend a group of colleagues, most of us in the ERP field, broke out the barbies and commandeered a stretch of shady beachfront. The group shares a passion: we are all in one way or another obsessed with manufacturing, which is why we began analysing the value chains that brought us the food and drink we were consuming. As we cleaned up our rubbish, we offered a silent and non-denominational prayer of thanks to the companies that bring us our modern cornucopia of beverages and food.

Back at work on Monday, I found myself brain-storming a blog topic. My mind, still half in weekend mode, turned gratefully to our food-manufacturing conversation. SYSPRO, after all, is the ERP of choice for hundreds of food and beverage companies. Our industry-specific functions are designed to ease the rigours of an extremely competitive industry, by managing financial complexities, optimising operations, guaranteeing quality, and offering precise control over every aspect of the supply chain.

Food Safety & Compliance

If you want to avoid giving a food manufacturer a nightmare, don’t mention Salmonella, E.coli, SARS, melamine, mad cow disease or bio-terrorism. All food production, in-home or in-factory, carries the potential for risk, but for manufacturers, the responsibility is vastly multiplied. Food and beverage companies need to ensure complete food security, as specified by government-mandated, industry-required food safety programs.

Food safety regulations begin with expiration dates and packaging, but extend to traceability of product throughout the entire supply chain. With SYSPRO’s Lot Traceability module, both tracking (farm-to-fork) and tracing (fork-to-farm) per product, lot and supplier ingredient is automatic and easily retrieved. For raw materials, products, packaging materials and processing equipment, a wealth of information is preserved at every point along the value chain, including incoming materials, manufacturing operations, inventory management and customer shipments. For every action that can impact food, at any point in the supply chain, SYSPRO enables a food processor to trace all ingredients back to their source, and all finished products to their retail, wholesale or food-service destinations.

Of course, all that information needs to be made actionable in the event of an emergency, both for consumer safety, and for brand protection. Government-mandated audits are bad enough, but there’s usually a grace period if procedures aren’t quite up to snuff. Mock recalls aren’t always as forgiving. Many processors that supply retail chains are now conducting mock recalls on a quarterly basis, and the cost of failure can be catastrophic, immediate, and final. With SYSPRO’s Lot Traceability, mock recalls are fully automated. Many of our customers can conduct a flawless mock recall in thirty minutes or less.

Of course, SYSPRO is, at root, accounting software, and discussions of functionality inevitably return to ROI. There’s even a value-add to our compliance measures. Lot traceability increases visibility along the supply chain, which can be leveraged to ensure food freshness and quality, improve customer service, streamline schedules and generally reduce the costs of business. In the warehouse, for example, traceability allows pickers to easily adhere to FIFO (first-in, first-out), while fulfilling longer-distance orders from lots that are in no danger of becoming outdated.

Trade Promotion Management

Trade promotions are an enormous element of the Sales & Marketing mix for most consumer goods companies, and food manufacturers are no exception. In fact, many of our customers cite trade promotions as a key component of growth. Promotions campaigns increase sales and provide companies with valuable information on consumer trends and changes – how well these campaigns are managed can be critical to success.

In years gone by, promotions were generally managed by sales team, but these days the prevalence, variety and importance of promotions necessitate the use of ERP. Fortunately for our customers, SYSPRO Trade Promotion Management makes it simple to negotiate the complexities of contract pricing, volume discounts, trade promotions, rebates, multitier credit checking and comprehensive reporting. SYSPRO TPM tracks off-invoice allowances and promotion deductions, and provides efficient reconciliations that result in increased collections. And of course, TPM is integrated into SYSPRO General Ledger, Accounts Receivable, Inventory Control, Sales Order & Invoicing modules. The bottom line? Reduction of confusion and complexity, huge savings in time, better information, better customer relationships, and (the pièce de résistance!) improved cash-flow and profitability.

***

In Part 2 of this blog, We will go deeper into SYSPRO’s industry-specific offerings for the food and beverage industry, and how all of these functionalities can be utilised – with lower capital costs – on the Cloud.

ASCI2018 Save the Date

Here at ASCI, it has been a pipeline dream of mine to run our own conference for the many members of ours in the community.  I am fortunate enough to announce, that this has become a reality and our very own conference ‘ASCI2018‘ is underway to be brought to you on 23 & 24 May 2018.

We have been working and will continue to be working hard in the lead up to ASCI2018. I am aware of the rapidly changing environment of the supply chain industry and the ASCI team have implemented this into the theme and program of the conference. ASCI2018, will allow for supply chain managers to receive some clarity around the latest industry developments admit a rapidly changing supply chain landscape due to e-Commerce disruptions.  This is why we have named the conference ASCI2018: e-Commerece: Driving Supply Chains into the Future.

Businessman Smiling During Meeting

The world is experiencing major disruptions. CEOs see more threats today versus three years ago, up 78% according to a recent study.* As e-Commerce turns the spotlight onto the supply chain, Operations, Logistics and Supply practitioners have a huge responsibility to offset these threats, leverage new technologies and build faster, better global supply chains. More than ever, these practitioners need to be at the top of their game, working together across functions within the organisation, and building the capability to respond to e-Commerce. Equally important is that this theme is addressed in relation to the technical best practice knowledge on which ASCI has laid its foundations.

Attending ASCI2018 will be a unique opportunity to engage your organisation’s entire supply chain, logistics and procurement teams in a professional learning experience. At ASCI, we’re passionate about helping members re-position themselves for sustainability in light of major disruptions. These major disruptions are coming thick and fast. We need to protect and educate our members so they can respond to such change.

Finally, I have to mention that we have selected our strategic endorsement partner, Akolade to help run our conference. We are very impressed with the quality and relevance of Akolade’s leading-edge, well researched events which we have been participating as the Endorsement Partner. Akolade has demonstrated the expertise and professional approach we require to run ASCI2018 and we look forward to collaborating yet again on our very own conference.

I am so proud of this achievement and milestone the ASCI team have accomplished. Looking back at all the hard work the team have done to make this conference happen shows how dedicated they are to bring the best of the best to our member base. I look forward to seeing you all at our conference.

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*PwC CEO Insights, 2017: http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/ceo-agenda/ceosurvey/2017/au/key-findings.html

 

Pieter Nagel
CEO
Australasian Supply Chain Institute (ASCI)

Why good leaders make you feel safe

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What makes a great leader? Management theorist Simon Sinek suggests, it’s someone who makes their employees feel secure, who draws staffers into a circle of trust.

But creating trust and safety — especially in an uneven economy — means taking on big responsibility. We’ve discussed this all important topic for ASCI members in a recent blog The Seven Tests of True Mastery. As supply change practitioners, we are accurately aware that our industries are certainly not immune to change, making our teams feel vulnerable and stressed. How do we support them?

ASCI members took the opportunity this week to attend the ASCI Networking evening which was live streamed on our closed Facebook page, ASCI Members, to hear what they needed to know about redundancy, redeployment and career transition and how they could make their teams feel safe and secure amidst a domain of disruption and change.

Expecting to hear the doom and gloom of unemployment, members were pleasantly surprised to hear that the top organisations in Australia are offering the very best outplacement services for employees experiencing redundancy or redeployment.

Four Fast facts

  1. Most employees will experience seven workplace changes
  2. Most employees will experience an estimated three redundancies
  3. Four out of five medium to large organisations globally utilise outplacement
  4. It is estimated 44% of jobs in Australia will be at risk due to developing technology.

According to Brendan O’Keeffe, Nova Partners, career transition is inevitable for all of us and supply chain managers will benefit from learning as much as they can about outplacement services and best practice during a restructure.

Brendan shared the Automotive industry as a best practice case in point, clearly one which is close to ASCI Members’ hearts. In particular, Toyota was presented as an example of a company which has excelled in communicating with employees about the restructure changes in the organisation from the very top of the organisation chart – giving employees full transparency to opportunities on offer, managers who they’d report to and locations in which to relocate.

Career transition consultation was made available to those choosing to move on – some to the most unlikely careers such as professional golfing and entrepreneurial ventures.

Information sharing and advice on roles and responsibilities was sought after employees by management, making employees feel like their tenure made a significant impact to the organisation.

The two year outplacement transition has made all employees at Toyota feel valued and motivated by the changes to the organisation, regardless of the outcomes for the individuals. This is a brand dream for most organisations.

However, Brendan O’Keeffe says many SME companies say outplacement services are a luxury they cannot afford, leaving employees without the support they require during restructures. In leui of this service, supply chain managers are forced to upskill and learn best practice ways to look after their teams during transition.

For more information about outplacement services and career transition, please contact ASCI Corporate Member, Brendan O’Keeffe at Nova Partners: bokeeffe@novapartners.com.au.

 

 

 

Embracing digital disruption

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Digitalization is changing the game for every industry—and every industry knows it. In one report dealing with the financial industry, 100% of business leaders surveyed said that they expect their sectors to be impacted by digital disruption in the future.

While almost 90% of manufacturers said they’d consider implementing digitally disruptive technology, only 28% think it will generate increased revenue, and only 13% see digitization as a path to a new revenue model. Manufacturers—and industries in general—are worried about the risks of digitally disrupting their current processes and technologies, especially if they’re already profitable.

System-wide change would cause trepidation in any organization, but it’s necessary to address those fears to be able to transition into the new age of hyper-connectivity. Right now, industries and companies need to figure out how they will embrace new technology, put aside their doubts, and make digital disruption work for them—before it’s working for one of their competitors.

Hear Infor President Duncan Angove discuss digital disruption and bridging the gap between what an analog company can deliver and what today’s digital customer expects.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

Are you prepared for digital transformation?

Unless you have blocked out every media message, it’s likely you’ve been exposed to the sweeping changes that digital innovation and technology are bringing to the business world. In fact, a few pundits have noted that the expectation for digital innovation and technology may surpass the business impact of the Internet.

The question is not a handwringing “what to do?” but rather “how can our organization take advantage?” Then, as quickly as possible, leap ahead of competition, grab market space and market share, garner a higher portion of wallet from customers, and make progress toward your goals.

In our experience, organizations typically grapple with three main goals:

1.   Connecting to their customers in a meaningful way—For example, an Australian customer we worked with saw the impact of moving from a manual paper-based sales order system to a digital-based system that is fast and accurate. And, it saw a typical 2-week contract renewal cycle reduced to just 1 hour. The Infor Digital Engineering team provided a way to evaluate existing processes, and propose the optimal mix of software solutions to help make this change happen.

2.   Improving employee engagement—With today’s multi-generational workforce and the ease of technologies like smartphones, iPads, apps, streaming, and such, many workers expect the work systems they use to operate much the same as those in their personal life. Working with several retail customers on work scheduling, we found it was typically incumbent on employees to go to the store to get their schedule. By examining the process, Infor digital engineers were able to understand the current operations, and integrate a digital system whereby employees are notified via text, email, or even their wearable technology about their work schedule.

3.   Creating greater operating efficiencies—That’s expected if you improve the connection to your customers and employees. But there is more opportunity here in the realm of data analytics. When it comes to digital innovation, this area is very important. Analytics used to mean a view of what was done yesterday, last week, or last month. But now, we can look forward with predictive and prescriptive analytic capabilities. There is solid research available discussing the impact of digital on growth. This slide from Dell Technologies shows 34% of businesses are evaluating what to do, and only 15% of companies are doing nothing. Don’t let that be you.

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About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

ERP Trends – Democracy in the Cloud

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The next great wave of technology is upon us, a global tsunami, heralding change in every facet of our lives. For manufacturers, the decade ahead will be transformative. As ERP deploys the power of Big Data and Predictive Analytics, harnesses the flow of information from the Internet of Things, incorporates Machine Learning, and immerses workers in an  increasingly intuitive UX, businesses will find themselves in possession of almost unimaginable agility, flexibility and control. Continue reading

Digital supply chain transformation: real and viable or just tech hype?

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The words “digital transformation” may appear to your colleagues as just the next tech hype. After all, weren’t we all just talking about cloud?

But just like cloud, digital transformation is real and viable — and here to stay.

Sure, but what is digital transformation exactly? There are as many definitions as there are pundits and luminaries. Infor President Duncan Angove talks about it this way: Digital transformation is about closing the gap between what your DIGITAL customers expect and what your ANALOG organisation can actually deliver. The aim of digital transformation is to go beyond merely automating a process or reducing costs, and to differentiate a company in significant ways from its competitors.

“Software and technology is disrupting every industry we look at,” Angove says. Whether it’s Uber in transportation or Airbnb in hostelry, every industry is being disrupted by the application of technology.

“Infor is at an interesting intersection, because we are a software cloud technology company that understands industries. So companies are coming to us, asking how we can help them navigate this digital disruption and take advantage of it.”

Here are just a few examples:

DSW – developing a strategy for a fresh customer experience

Nordstrom – creating a converged commerce experience for customers

Travis Perkins – delivering a variety of strategic, technical, and financial benefits

Fuller’s – deploying cloud software as the basis of a radical business process transformation to drive growth

Echoing these customers, Infor recently hosted groups of executives from the US and Europe to discuss digital transformation. Representing manufacturing, financial services, consumer packaged goods (CPG), retail, and media and entertainment all said their organisations have digital initiatives under way.

Within digital, three common themes emerged: executive leadership is essential; employee skills have to keep pace; and the data deluge must be harnessed into actionable insights. Here is a summary of one of the events.

So, where should your company start? Get inspired here.

 

About our Guest Blogger

Helen Masters
Vice President & Managing Director, Infor South Asia — ANZ & ASEAN

Helen Masters_VP ANZ & ASEAN_2_highres

Helen Masters is Vice President, South Asia – Infor ANZ & ASEAN where she is responsible for the development and promotion of global corporate products and seamless customer experience to augment market presence in the Pacific and ASEAN regions. These comprise Australia & New Zealand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Singapore.

In her role, Helen maintains new product lines with a focus on customer and partnership management and strategy-setting to grow business in Infor’s key micro-verticals in the South Asia region.

Prior to Infor, Helen was Vice President, Commercial and Emerging Markets, SAP; and Head, Emerging and Transformational Alliances Group, Cisco Systems where she was responsible for the launch of data business solutions.

Helen is a graduate of Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia and is also certified in Computer Programming.

Marketing teams are discovering great brand stories in supply chain

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The number of CMOs becoming more knowledgeable and enthusiastic about supply chain management is increasing as leading companies lean on supply chain attributes to position, promote and differentiate products, services and brands.  If you’re a marketer looking for a great story to tell about your company—one that will capture the hearts and minds of a generation of customers—you may need to look no further than your supply chain.

While product marketing and sales teams have always worked with supply chain to balance supply and demand and ensure a positive customer experience, the corporate marketing teams are waking up to the power of supply chain performance.  Supply chain performance is a big deal, a big differentiator, and a game-changer that can dictate the difference between generations of locked-in loyal customers and lost customers for life.

In the past, marketing leaders dug in to supply chain particulars when there was an issue that affected marketing—like a product recall or stockout over the holidays; or an environmental or social issue that might negatively impact the brand; or when there was a risk challenge that required public relations support, like a plant closure, natural disaster or political unrest.

But now, as the supply chain becomes more integral to competitive advantage, profitable growth and sustainable practices, a growing number of CMOs are recognizing that a high-performing supply chain is an important differentiator, and they are incorporating supply chain capabilities into messaging, campaigns, loyalty programs and even events. They are aware of the impact the supply chain can have on their brand—both positive and negative­—and they take proactive measures to protect and promote it.

To the visionary CMO, the supply chain doesn’t run in the background. The supply chain is part of the story. It is part of the customer experience and an ingredient in the brand promise. It’s become a visible component in the marketing mix.

Excellent examples of marketing that weave in supply chain stories abound.  Remember the Ralph Lauren sweaters for the Sochi Winter Olympics? They were the flagship product for Ralph Lauren’s “Made in America” line of apparel for the athletes, rolled out with the story of the Oregon ranchers who raise the sheep and shear the wool, and all the steps in the supply chain required to provide the red, white and blue yarn for the sweaters.  An example of a supply chain inspired marketing event is Amazon Prime Day, when Amazon marketed its Prime subscription service through a rotating lineup of retail specials and same-day shipping that showed off its supply chain supremacy. And there’s the ongoing Jimmy John restaurants’ “Freaky Fast” campaign that’s not just about speedy sandwich delivery, but also embodies an entire corporate culture and its nimble supply chain of fresh ingredients.

Beyond the aforementioned high-visibility examples, there’s the almost endless number of companies offering personalization options (pick your color, add that monogram, design the perfect product just for you!) enabled by supply chain mass customization and make-to-order flexibility. If you’re a marketer and you haven’t been thinking about supply chain, it’s time to start.  Your supply chain is – or could be – a key chapter in your brand story or the attribute that that turns your customers into evangelists.

Is your CMO forging a more strategic relationship with the supply chain organization? If not, can the supply chain manager reach out to marketing to begin such a partnership? How could your firm’s supply chain performance be leveraged as a marketing tool? Weigh in with your thoughts. Read more

 

Meet our guest blogger:

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Jennifer K Daniels
Vice President, Marketing, APICS