Five reasons why the APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) could be your most audacious career move yet

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More than 25,000 supply chain practitioners have studied the APICS Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP) to master the essential technology, concepts, and strategies related to end-to-end supply chain operations. Here’s how it can benefit your career in 2019:

  1. Get promoted by developing unique solutions for the end-to-end supply chain like Arsalan Hussain who after studying CSCP, designed a management dashboard with end-to-end data and KPI visibility which was used by management for reporting. Arsalan was transferred to Procurement and Analytics and within two years promoted to Manager of Supply Chain. On average CSCP designees see a 12% pay increase and improve their hiring potential by 65%.
  2. Gain new ways to collaborate with partners like Maria Petrochenkova who after CSCP, developed the skills to effectively couple strategic buyers with product managers to drive innovation.
  3. Grow prospects for general management roles like Kuban Chetty whose finance background and CSCP study honed his skills to implement productivity initiatives around total supply chain, incorporating planning and operations management. He became confident in running financial scenarios around total supply chain activities and implement productivity initiatives focused on factory planning and highlighting capacity usages.
  4. Lead initiatives where supply chain is the business enabler like Nate Joliff who  after studying CSCP applied it to capture key data on extended database processes for racks and container design which helped minimise transportation and storage costs by 15%, saving US$2.3M to the bottom line.
  5. Bolster evidence for Practitioner Registration eligibility. ASCI’s newly launched Practitioner Registrations for Procurement, Logistics and Operations Management require eligibility through evidence of relevant certifications, qualifications and work experience. According to Dr Pieter Nagel, ASCI’s CEO-Professionalisation, the APICS CSCP is a favourable component for eligibility for registration and furthermore provides a significant knowledge base for examination preparation for the Professional Registration to be made available in 2019.
What’s more, you can now tap into accessible and affordable study options via self study and ASCI Guided Learning two hourly weekly sessions online either within the weekday or week evening as part of ASCI’s online pilot program with APICS! Register to 2019 classes before December 2018 and you’ll receive $100 savings. For more information, please contact us via enquiries@asci.org.au
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Five reasons why APICS CPIM is a must for every ERP user and consultant

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For the most part of my career, I have been known to be an active member of the APICS community. This means that, quite frequently, I interact with SCM practitioners and ERP consultants from different industries and with different professional backgrounds. During discussions, I am often asked what ways are best to acquire more in-depth-knowledge of the SCM/ERP domains.

Drawing from my 9 years of extensive, hands-on experience in the fields of Supply Chain Management and SAP ECC ERP implementation/support within the Pharmaceutical and FMCG industries, and a unique techno-functional skill set in SCM enabling technologies and Domain Expertise in the SAP PP/PP-PI module, I have compiled some advice for others.

When reflecting on numerous SAP ERP implementation/improvement projects, I keep falling back on the certainty and solidarity of the APICS certification: Certified in Production and Inventory Management (CPIM) which I believe was one of the main factors that led to my implementation success. Here are five reasons why I believe the APICS CPIM is a must for every ERP user and consultant:

  1. It harnesses your talents: It is widely believed that a lack in SCM talent is the reason behind many ERP implementation failures or less than optimal ERP performances – both the user/consultant sides. And while there is no one-size-fits-all kind of advice, the APICS CPIM certification has so many benefits to both users/consultants that I almost always advise people to pursue APICS CPIM because it is more about getting the best ROI of an ERP implementation.
  2. It follows a process-orientated approach: ERP commercial packages are all built to computerise the classical value chain activities of a company. These value chain activities are resembled in the modular structure that all commercial ERP packages follow. For example, business processes relating to Supply Chain Planning including, Sales and Operations Planning, Demand Management, Production Planning/Scheduling would be found under the Production Planning “PP/PP-PI” module in SAP ECC ERP. Likewise, other business process compromising a company’s value chain would be found as “canned” business processes across different modules of an ERP solution. The CPIM follows a process orientated approach to Supply Chain planning in a fashion that’s is almost identical to what is found in a SCM/Manufacturing Modules of and ERP package. This strategic fit between how ERP systems are structured and the process-oriented structure of the CPIM courseware is what makes CPIM the most powerful framework for SCM/ERP professionals in both user/consultant roles.

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    Australasian Supply Chain Institute offers the CPIM Learning System for self study or together with Guided Learning sessions, available right across Australia

  3. It mirrors the same language as your ERP: The concepts and terminology of an SCM/Manufacturing module of an ERP system, such as MPS/MRP, BOM, phantom assemblies, time fences and forecast consumption techniques, just to name a few, that prove tricky for most users/consultants to grasp are explored in-depth in the CPIM courseware in an a clear and easy to follow approach with plenty of real life examples. This helps to better utilise system functionalities/features that are likely to be ignored due to the lack of underrating of such concepts.
  4. It builds confidence to apply a configuration effort: CPIM equips designees with knowledge that proves critical to guide system configuration efforts in the SCM area.
  5. It results in better, more streamlined implementations and a higher ROI for digital transformation efforts: Many companies the likes of BASF, DuPont and Intel have adopted APICS frameworks which helped them achieve organisational goals and increase the efficiency of their systems and people. It’s why over 110,000 other SCM practitioners around the world have attained the CPIM. Now it’s up to you. https://www.apics.org/apics-for-business/customer-stories

By Hatem Abu Nusair, M.Sc. Engineering, CPIM-F, CSCP-F, SAP Certified Application Associate, APICS Master Instructor

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Hatem is a Global Supply Chain Management & ERP Expert. He is currently the Production Planner at Tip Top, one of GWF’s divisions in Sydney, having moved from Jordan where he worked for a blue-chip international company that grew rapidly. Here, Hatem founded the Regional Middle East & North Africa (MENA) Supply Chain Department with the purpose of optimising Supply Chain performance across 13 subsidiaries through demand management and forecasting, capacity management, inventory control, and special projects, which entails: IT initiatives, ERP implementation, re-engineering of Supply Chain processes and other relevant matters.

Hatem is a qualified Industrial Engineer and a Master of Manufacturing Engineering candidate at UNSW. He is a Certified Fellow in Production and Inventory Management (CPIM-F) by APICS, a Certified Fellow Supply Chain Professional (CSCP-F) by APICS and a Certified Application Associate by SAP SE.

Hatem will be facilitator for Term 4 CPIM Part 2 Guided Learning for Australasian Supply Chain Institute where will be share his passion of streamlining supply chain processes, eliminating redundancies and utilising enabling technology to achieve operational goals with CPIM Part 2 students.

 

 

The Two Levers of Inventory Optimisation

By Henry Canitz, Director of Product Marketing & Business Development , Logility

When I hear the term “Lever” my mechanical engineering side comes out and I think of the Physics and Mechanical Design courses I took some 30+ years ago. Although I didn’t appreciate it at the time, my engineering education laid a strong foundation that has helped me be as successful as possible in whatever I did. More than anything, I learned how to analyse and solve problems. So when I think of a lever I think of a rigid bar resting on a pivot or fulcrum, used to help move a heavy or a firmly fixed load with one end when pressure is applied to the other.

Back to present day and the supply chain. Two powerful levers a company can use to optimise inventory are “Working Capital” and “Customer Service Levels.” Through the effective use of these levers, you can free trapped working capital while improving service levels.

Your company’s inventory efficient frontier is a tradeoff curve between working capital and service level and represents the currently achievable service level at any corresponding inventory investment. At its most basic, start with a piece of graph paper and plot your current service level on the x-axis and current inventory level on the y-axis. Chances are you are not on the inventory efficiency curve that is theoretically possible given your current operating capabilities. When you remove inefficiencies, failures, etc. and estimate how much your service level will go up and down with changes in inventory investment you end up with a curve – your current inventory efficient frontier curve. Organisations can slide up and down along this curve by manipulating the service and inventory levers (see Figure 1).

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However to create real value you have to be able to shift the inventory efficient frontier so that higher service levels can be achieved without increasing inventory or the same service levels can be achieved with less inventory. Multi-echelon Inventory Optimisation (MEIO) allows you to truly optimise your inventory across the entire supply chain and enables you to shift to a new efficient frontier for your entire supply chain (Read the eBook: The Inventory Optimization Handbook).

By modeling the end-to-end supply chain, MEIO determines not only the optimal inventory to carry at each location but also at which locations each item should be carried. MEIO looks across sales channels, distribution tiers, and even types of inventory (raw, WIP, FG) to understand how best to minimise total inventory while still providing the desired customer service levels. MEIO can take you into unexplored territory providing reductions in working capital of up to 30 percent or more. For most companies that amounts to millions of dollars in savings annually. That is an impressive use of levers.

What is important to understand is that the supply chain is a living, breathing and constantly changing organism. Your optimal inventory strategy for this month might be suboptimal next month due to changes in demand or supply, changes in competition or market health, or a variety of other factors. Modeling your end-to-end supply chain inventory is not a “one and done” activity and therefore there is always opportunity to shift that efficient frontier into new and undiscovered territory.

Do you understand your company’s service level – working capital tradeoff? Can you model your end-to-end supply chain to determine your optimal inventory locations and levels?

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Henry Canitz, Director of Product Marketing & Business Development, Logility

 

 

10 ways to detect and prevent procurement fraud

BribesProcurement fraud is rising sharply and it may be affecting your entire organisation.  According to the 2015 Kroll Global Fraud Report, 75% of companies experienced a fraud incident in the past year. 81% of companies affected by fraud reported insider perpetrators.

Despite its impact on business, very few people know what it is.  In short, procurement fraud is:

“Inducing any course of action by deceit or other dishonest conduct, involving acts or omissions or the making of false statements, orally or in writing, with the object of obtaining money or other benefit from, or of evading a liability to, the organisation.”

Awareness of this issue is required right across the mid to senior level of the organisation, not exclusively within the procurement department. Which begs the question:

How well does your organisation manage fraud?

Here are ten ways to check your procurement fraud detection and prevention capabilities:

  1. Have you clearly identified procurement fraud indicators/red alerts?
  2. Are you aware of common corruption and fraudulent practices, such as schemes, bribes and kickbacks, false, inflated or duplicative invoices?
  3. Have you adopted techniques for fraud detection, prevention, and evaluation and move from reactive fraud investigation to proactive anticipation, detection, prevention and deterrence of fraud risk?
  4. How well do you deal with collusion among contractors and between contractors and employees,  such as collusive bidding (bid rigging), bid rotation, or bid suppression?
  5. What are your methodologies for detection of collusion?
  6. Are you well aware of fraudulent activities in tenders and contracts such as bid manipulation, unbalanced bidding, leaking of bid data, bid splitting and unjustified Sole Source Awards?
  7. Do you know how to manage a fraud investigation?
  8. Have you developed fraud and corruption control guidelines?
  9. Do you have a fraud prevention policy?
  10. Do you have a framework for a Procurement Code of Conduct?

If you would like to improve your organisation’s knowledge and capabilities in this area, consider a two day course like this one: “Procurement Fraud – “Identification, Detection and Prevention” held at our National office next month.

Dr Pieter Nagel is CEO at apicsAU – Australasia’s Premier Professional Supply Chain Community

With a working career spanning over 30 years in Logistics, Procurement and Supply Chain Management, Dr Nagel commenced his career in his birth country, South Africa. He developed an international reputation as a leader in Supply Chain Strategy and facilitates courses in Procurement Fraud across Asia Pacific.